La Tromba Music-Home

Hello and Welcome to our
La Tromba Music Productions website!

In the name of all of the very fine Artists, excellent Technicians and otherwise musically passionate persons working for and with La Tromba Music Productions, I wish to personally welcome you to this, our website.

Here's our new Soundcloud link:
Richard Carson Steuart on Soundcloud
 

 

Our most recent and on going Trumpet Project is: 

The Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project - 2020


J.S. Bach's Solo-Trumpeter,Gottfried Reiche and his Clarino Trumpet / “Tromba da caccia” Instrument: it's re-discovery, authentic musical application and newly discovered playing technique (including hand-refelection intonational/tempering techniques) that allow a full cromatic / well tempered tuning and playing technique to be applied to the virtuoso works of Johann Sebastian Bach, written (and even rewritten!) specifically for Gottfried Reiche from 1722 to his death in 1734 by none other than J.S. Bach himself !

Through building of my own Tromba da caccia instrument, in combination with my personal and direct practise and Concert performace study there of and with, I believe I have finally uncovered the original playing technique of the Tromba da caccia and how Reiche, himself both a respected composer and a highly acclaimed virtuoso on many instruments in his time, long before Bach's appointment as Thomas Kantor in Leipzig in 1723, was able to play Johann Sebastian Bach's most demanding works (including the Christmas Oratorio :Tönet, ihr Pauken! Erschallet, Trompeten! (BWV 214) first performed on the 12th of August, 1733 in Leipzig with Gottfried Reiche as Solo Trumpeter) on this mysterious and today almost forgotten instrument!

My main objective with the all new "Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project 2020" is to revive the true and original performance techniques and instrumenation of Bach works written for Gotffried Reiche and his intrument and to make Recordings with Film Documentation of both the Recording Sessions in a "Making of" fashion and in "Live" Public Concert(s) using these Tromba da caccia instruments together with a Historical "Baroque" Orchestra, Choir and Solo Singers.

The projected Concert and Recording Programm in 2020 will be:

Johann Sebastian Bach:

I Der Himmel lacht! Die Erde jubilieret  (BWV 31)
First performance on 9. 4. 1724 in Leipzig with Gottfried Reiche as Solo Trumpeter on the Tromba da caccia

II Die Weltlichen Kanaten:
Tönet, ihr Pauken! Erschallet, Trompeten! (BWV 214)

First performance on 8. 12. 1733 in Leipzig with Gottfried Reiche as Solo Trumpeter on the Tromba da caccia

III Preise dein Glücke, gesegnetes Sachsen(215)
First performance on 5. 10. 1734 in Leipzig with Gottfried Reiche as Solo Trumpeter on the Tromba da caccia (Reiche's last musical contribution!)

IV Du Sollt Gott, deinen Herre, lieben (BWV 77)
First performance on 22. 08. 1734 in Leipzig 
Including the Aria: "Ach, es bliebt in meiner Liebe lauter Unvollkommenheit..."
performed by Gottfried reiche as Solo Trumpeter on the Tromba da caccia

Further Solo works to be recorded on the Tromba da caccia:

Alessandro Scarlatti:
Cantata for Sopran, Tromba da caccia and String Orchestra

"Su Le Sponde Del Tebro"

Pavel Josef Vejvanovsky: 
Sonata á 4 in g-moll
for Tromba da caccia Strings and B.c. (Cembalo/ Organ)

Girolamo Fantinis
Sonata Prima in C for Organ/Cembalo and Trumpet, as well as selected Dances, Songs and Capprici

from „Modo per Imparare a Sonare di Tromba“ for Cembalo / Orgel (1638)

For much more complete info about our:
"Tromba da caccia 2020"
Project please schroll directly down to:    " * "

I have had the personal great fortune to have been performing professionally since 1966 (now over 54 years!) and teaching at University Level Institutions since 1970.

During this whole time I have become increasingly aware that Cooperation and Consultation, is the true key to both Personal and Musical Character Building AND True Artistic Development and is truly the best way to achieve one's highest goals! And certainly not the common and all too often "selfish and cold-competitive attitudes" that cloud many minds and numb so many ears in our profession of late ... or was it always so?... preventing so many individuals from hearing other persons hard earned and well deserved artistic and pedagogical achievments and therefore not being able to be inspired by them!

From my own earliest and most humble musical beginnings in my small home town of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada as Sunday Morning "kid" Solo-Cornetist in the "Salvation Army Brass Band" (at age ten), through to my first major engagments in Europe as 1. Solo Trumpeter of both the German Opera in Düsseldorf and the World Touring "Bamberger Symphoniker" (at age 22) my musical experience has been continually enjoyable for me! As the winner (without even really competing, at least in my own mind) of numerous International Solo Trumpet Competitions and  Prizes, Radio and Television Solo Concerts Tours and CD Recordings from Big Band and Film Music, over International Instrument Consulting, Designing and Maufacturing, to my present Historical Trumpet Research, Perfomance and Recording efforts on Authenic "Period" instruments, my life has been a continual musical adventure!
Yes, a Musician's life that has truly given me an unusually broad spectrum insite into what I call the "Complete World of the Trumpet".


During this entire exciting 5 decade time period, I have met, taught and performed with many thousands of Music Students and Top Professionals, as well as enjoyed working with thousands of truly excellent "Hobby- Musicians" from all musical directions and interests and these from all over the world.
And I
can sincerely say that because of them ALL my life and my intensively diverse career has really been really good to me, and for this I am truly grateful.

Here's a little "Biographical Info." + about me, that you can just skip, if you are busy or get bored with things this or just want to "cut to the chase!!!"...

+
I was born on January 31st, 1956 in Weyburn, Sasakatchewan Canada and moved with my family to Regina in 1960. My first intensive musical instruction began in 1965, on my 9th birthday under the tutelage of my father, Kenneth Leslie Steuart, a Sask-Tel Telecommunications Engineer and a serious brass-playing hobby musician. He bought my first Cornet, a used but well taken care of, "Nickel Silver Conn Constellation" that cost him 360 Bucks... and back then... that was lot of money to invest in a little kid who had never played note on any instrument before in his life. The great english Author, Charles Dickens would call this "Great Expections". Which in any case demanded to be lived up to!
My first public performance was in 1966 as Cornet Soloist in the Rosemont United Church in Regina, together with the very special Mrs. Edith Chisholm, a wonderfull musician and a very gracious and truly patient (especially with me) lady who was to become as my regular accompaniest on both the Organ and Piano for Concerts of all sorts Including those for the LIONS, ROTARY, SCHREINERS etc. Service  Clubs,Televison Apperances and even perfomance for the Govenor General and these over the for next few years. This began was after only one year of any kind of musical studies and was mostly due to my Father's abition, and not mine.
My beloved Father had recognised my inate talent, because I continually Sang as a child, especially when enjoying some event or even when eating (in this case opf Hummming the whole time)and tookit upon himself to support my natural talents as much as pssible: He sat with me every time I practised the Cornet and after six months of "lessons with him" on to in every lesson with Dr. John Harding for almost one and one half years after that! That's a total of 730 lesson in two years.
It is mostly because of his intensive support I became a repeated Class A-Open First Prize winner in the Regina and Saskatchewan Provincial Music festivals for the Cornet and Trumpet starting at age 11 and was even the Junior First Prize Winner (for students 16 years and under) of the Canadian National Music Festival in 1967, perfomring amoung other works of the classical repertoire the Hummel Trumpet Concerto
At age 11, I undertook my first "Jazz" tour as featured "junior" Trumpet Soloist as a part of the 1967 Canadian National Centenary Concert Festivities. Here I was accompanied by a full professional Big Band, led by my first professional teacher, Dr. John Harding, who was / is an excellent Trumpeter in both the Jazz and Classical idioms as well as being a fine Arranger and a very disaplined, excellent Teacher, Band Leader and Personality.
At age 12 Mr. Harding left Canada to return to the US of A  as Professor for trumpet at the UNCC In North Carolina and I began to study the Cornet with Dr. Mel Carey of Berlee California, a excellent Hornist and Concert Pianist who insisted that learn the Piano, Clarinet, Oboe as well as Musical History, Theory and Harmony at the Conservatory of Music in Regina.
Involved in various musical groups in Regina and throughout Saskatchewan from the very beginning of my studies, I performed as Solo Cornetist with the Salvation Army Brass, the Regina Police Boys, the Royal Canaian Legion Band and the Saskatchewan Youth Band then lead by Mr. Herb Jefferys.
I was the First Trumpet and Soloist and 1. Assistant Conductor to Lloyd Blackmann of the Regina Inter- Collegiate and Saskatchewan Youth Orchestras and a co- founder of the University of Saskatchewan Brass Quintet (with my father on the Tuba, Dr. Mel Carey on the Horn, Bob Gregg, on theTrombone and David Bryant, as 2. Trumpet) performing throughout Saskatchewan in Concerts as well as "Live" on both Television and CBC Radio.
From the age of 14 I also performed as Solo-Trumpet of the University of Saskatchwan Symphonic Concert Band under John Steinegger and with the the "Jazz Big-Band" of the University with Randy Herrmann as "Leader". I had become a member of the Regina Symphony Orchestra 1969 at age 13, advancing to the Solo Trumpet position in the 1971/72 Season at age 15 until imwas 20 years of age under Boris Brott. During this time had the great fortune to perform as both Soloist with that Orchestra and as Duo Partner with amoung others the Internationally renown musicans, the unforgottem Canadian Soprano Star, Maurine

In 1970, at the age of 14, I also accepted my first Trumpet Teaching- Assistantship to Dr. Mel Carey and was given my own personal Teaching and Practise Studio at the University of Saskatchewan, Regina Campus oin College Avenue.
Having previously also studied Saxophone (and Clarinet) at the Regina Conservatory, I began to teach beginner Clarinet and Saxophone for the Regina City School District.
From 1970 to 1975, I was Solo Trumpeter and featured Solist of both the National Youth Chamber and National Youth Symphony Orchestras of Canada under Conductors such as the Austrian born, Georg Tintner and Japanese born Kazuyoshi
Akiama performing extended Summer Concert tours with these orchestras to among other major Canadian cities: Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec and Montreal. The Brass Instrument  coaches during this time were amoung other, Fred Mills (and the entire Canadian Brass Quintet), Theodore Weisse (Solo-Trumpeter of New York City Opera): Vincent Chicowitz (2. Trumpeter of the Chicago Symphony)  Eugene Rittich (Solo Horn of the Toronto Symphony), Richard Erb Bass trombone of the St. Louis Symphony).

 

In 1976, at age 20 and already CBC Radio Soloist and Solo-trumpeter of Canadian Chamber Orchestra under the famous Composer and Conductor Aaron Copland, I won both the First Prize at the Canadian National Music Festival in Toronto and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio and Television Classical Solo-Instrumental Competition - the so called "CBC Talent Festival" (and this for all Symphonic Wind-Instruments). Consiquently I perfomed for Live for Radio and Televison as Soloist with amoung others the orchestra, the Vancouver CBC, the Edmonton Symphony, the Winnipeg CBC Symphony, and the Saskatoon Chamber and Symhpony Orchestras respectively with amoung other conductors John Avison and Boris Brott.
Thereafter I was accepted into the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, USA receiving a full 4 year Scholarship. I had competed for and was awarded the first of three consecutive International Study Grants (1976-1978) from the Arts Council of Canada, with which I studied first in Philadelphia (76/77), then Chicago and in turn in New York (77/78) with the foremost members of the Symphony and Opera Orchestras of those major American cultural centers. My teachers were most secifically Frank Kaderabek (Solo Trumpet of the Philadelphia, Orchestra, the 2.Trumpet and Professor at North Western Unversity in Chicago, Vincent Chicowitz and Mr. Mel Broiles, Solo Trumpet of the Metroploitan Opera of New York.

Travelling to Europe in the summer of 1978 as Solo Trumpet of the World Youth Orchestra, I remaind and decided to completed my studies in London with Philip Jones, founder of the Large Brass Ensemble bearing his name and later Principal of the Trinity College; London. Thereafter I journeyed to Munich to Study with with Mr. Rolf Quinque of Munich Philharmonic and Head of the Brass Deptment of the Richard Strauss Conservatory.
The beginning of November I competed for and was awarded the position of Solo-Trumpeter of the "German Opera on the Rhein" in Düsseldorf under GMD Bernhard Klee.
In February of 1979 I also accepted the position as Solo-Trumpeter of the world touring, "Bamberg Symphoniker" under Eugen Jochen.
Thereafter I competed for and won the Top Prizes in both the German- ARD (1980) and Swiss- SRF (1981) International Radio and Television Competitions for the Trumpet as Solo Instrument.

My early musical accomplishments in Germany were officially honoured by the Bavarian State Ministry of Culture when a special position was created for me in 1983 at their Music Conservatory / State University of Music in Wuerzburg, Northern Bavaria where I continue to teach both Historical and Modern Trumpet as well as Chamber Music even today.


As the co-founder of among other high profile ensembles, the German Brass Ensemble (1979), the Munich Brass (1983) the European Baroque Ensemble  (1989) and the "Prince Bishop of Wuerzburg's Wind Ensemble" (1999) I was aswell elected President of the European Trumpet Guild in 2003.

Through the performing literally thousands of "Live" concerts, Producing, Directing and Conducting well over 20 Solo and Ensemble CDs from Classic to Jazz for my own "La Tromba Music Productions" company, as well as recording for RCA, BMG, EMI, MMO/New York, the Konstantin and Koch- International Film Production Companies touring with various top musical constellations for Ballett and Opera, as Symphonic Solo-Trumpeter, Solo Concert Soloist with Concert Bands symphony and Chamber Orchsteras (Both woth Historical amd Modern Intruments , with Brass Ensembles, Mixed Modern Music Fusion-Ensembles, Big Bands, Brass Bands, Rock Bands, Gala Bands, Jazz Combos, in Duo Concerts with Piano, Organ , Guitar and String Quartett, in diverse Chamber Ensembles as "Soloist-Leader", even playing briefly in the "Barum and Baileys-"Greatest Show on Earth!" Circus Band!,... well you name it! ... my Musical Experience has, over the past 50 +  years of my career become truly broadspectrum and extensive. Thank you GOD!

Having Toured with a Big Band at age 11 and as a featured Recording-Artist starting at age 14 for the CBC-Canada (1970 to 1977), and from 1978 for the German Radio and Televison Stations: WDR, BR, SDR, ARD, SRF, NDR as well through touring with diverse groups ranging from English and German Pop Modern-Fusion Orchestras as well as with international Historical Music Ensembles, yes even for major European and Hollywood Films, my musical experience has developed continually. For all of this I am sincerely thankfull.

As Guest Professor in many major Conservatories and Universities in the USA and Canada, several German "Hoch Schulen" from Hamburg to Munich, in Russia at the Genisin Institute, the Mousorgsky, Rhymsky-Korsakov and Tschaikovsky Conservatories as well as through Concert Tours as Soloist and/or as Solo Trumpeter in Symphony and Chamber Orchestras in China, Japan, Morocco, Tunesia, South Africa, the Ukraine, Slovenia, Croatia, Greece, etc. etc. and of course throughout most of the "EU", I have had the special opportunity to developed a great deal of practical experience, musical versatility and general knowledge regarding consitant trumpet performance and necessarily much about the international methodical teaching thereof.


Bla Bla Bla... anyway, it is because of all of these broad spectrum, often truly positive and always very exciting musical experinces that I have had during this wonderful musical journey that I was motivated to reach out to the intensively competitive "world of trumpeters" with a new, and I hope an truly "open" approach towards our Profession with a sincerely Colleagial Attitude.

Through this La Tromba Music website,... I hope to promote our "profession" and take it to a higher level which. A Profession, that for many of us is much much more than only that...it is our true "Passion"!

Now, a wise man once said "no man is an Island" !... espeically when he (ok, ok "or she") has real problems
and in case you didn't know: Louis Armstrong had "King" Oliver... Miles Davis had Clarke Terry and "Dizzy" Gillespe, Rafael (Ralf) Mendez had Herbert L. Clarke, Roy Hargrove had Wynton Marsallis, Edward H. Tarr had Adolf "Bud" Herseth to ask questions of... and personally could literally "pick up the telephone" (indeed a wonderfull invention!) and talk with Philip Jones, Rolf Qunique, Ed Tarr, Frank Kaderabek, Vincent Chicowitz, Michael Laird, Bobby Shew, Fred Mills, Venjamin Margolin, John Harding, Maurice Murphy (and the list goes on and on of those that I could call for serious career advise or when things were going a little "wrong" at times... i.e. when I was radically changing my embouchure and teeth positioning or looking for a better Horn or Mouthpiece, had endurance tounging, flexablity or range problems, or was just trying to figure why I still couldn't play Double High C after all those years ... and why everybody else, besides me, thought that this was somehow very important!?)
A short "a side":
Mason Jones (45 Years Solohorn of the Philadelphia Orchestra under amoung other Conductor Legends, Eugen Ormandy said to me once after a Brass Sectional Class in the Curtis Institute in 1976 ..." Richard, please don't try to play too high on the Trumpet... it, like every other instrument, sounds best in the middle register!" And he was right!
Funny though that was the year they filmed the very first "Rocky" picture, yes some of it atleast right their in Phili and with music from the unforgotten... yes "unforgetable" High-Note Genius Maynard Ferguson of Montreal, Canada...with it's his "Baroque" based (introduction... stollen from Montiverdi or Bendinelli? ) Pop Chart hit "Gonna Fly (HIGH) Now!"
Bringing it "all together" and this in Maynard's incomparable way,  musically "full circle"!
Yes, I even had the great fortune to talk to Maynard completely alone about mouthpiece and horn(s) twice! Once in 1972 in Vancouver... back Stage when he was warming up at the now defunked Bellevidere Jazz Festival... he even let me stick my finger in his mouthpiece to to "physically" messure the cup depth! Wow when I think back... who would allow that now a days!?! increadible!) and then a good 35 years later in Brehmen Germany after a concert organised by Otto Sauter and his rather ostentaciously named "Ten of the Best!" Trumpet Ensemble (including the then up and coming youngster Allan Visutti).
Maynard was in the same hotel as I had reserved for another Trumpet and Guitar Concert Gig that very week (by pure chance !) . We talked about other more important stuff then however.. good wine and good food!

OK talk talk talk... BUT honestly now...
who do you have to ask YOUR important "trumpet specific" (and hopefully more importantly "musical" questions than "what was Maynard's mouthpiece REALLY like?") or to simply "compare notes" with??? about you problems and or experinces...

...the bottom line IS:
if YOU TOO have real problems or simple but honest questions, be it from breathing techniques to emboucher development, trumpets and mouthpieces selection to study books and performance literature, or even have your own personal contribution as to how to make this La Tromba Music website an especially positive experience for you AND your fellow students or Professional Colleagues,
please feel free to go to "Contact" and leave me your comments or question(s)... no worries, I'll get back to you, for sure!...

Or, better still, just call here and make an appoinment
( as I mentioned earlier I love that Alexander Graham Bell guy and his incredible invention: The Telephone!!!... it is, in my humble opinion, the best invention since Piston-Valves and Valve Oil *)

to see me personally in the quaint but friendly:

 


La Tromba Music Productions "Studio"
here in the HOFSTRASSE 10 - 97070 Wuerzburg, Germany.

 

Tel / Fax: 0049 931 35 36 574
 

Or send me/us and E-mail to:

la.tromba.steuart@web.de

Sincerely yours,

Richard Carson Steuart
for
La Tromba Music Productions


 

* à propos, the popular Valve Oil brand "La Tromba" is I believe still Made in Switzerland ... but was bought-out by the German Musical Instrument Company named "Arnold Stoelzel" a few years go...hmmmmm is it a German / EU company now or is it still a Swiss based Product under a new name?
Anyway, for clarity, I and La Tromba Music Productions team have nothing to do with "La Tromba" Oil or the Stoelzel people and infact I personally recommend (... but only when asked!!!) and use either Al Cass "Fast" (from way back in the 70s when I played Schilke trumpets and still have 5 or 6 of them) or Rich Zabo's "good smelling" Valve Oil ...but NOT on my new Tromba da caccia.(Ha ha ;--)

Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project 2015-2020

* Gottfried Reiche's Tromba da caccia and it's extraordinary playing technique!

*
In August of 2017, Richard Carson Steuart completed the development of his all new "La Tromba" Clarino Trumpet, a hand made replica of the special "Clarino / Tromba da caccia" instrument that Johann Sebastian Bach's famous Solo Trumpeter, Johann Gottfried Reiche originally performed Bach's works on.

Mr. Steuart had named this, his sincere attempts at a truly historical research and deveopment endevor, the "Clarino- Project zu Leipzig" since it honored the 350th year of Reiche's birth!

Just as Johann Gottfried Reiche's original instrument, shown in the Haussmann's original Oil- Painting above, Steuart's La Tromba Music Productions "Prototype" Tromba da caccia has no valves, no keys, no slides, and certainly not "hinden" non-authentic intonation-holes of any kind!

The basic idea is to bring J.S. Bach's Solo-Trumpeter, Gottfried Reiche and his Clarino Trumpet as “Tromba da caccia” Instrument back into focus and deservedly re-discovery the authentic musical application and playing technique (including hand refelection) that allowed him to be able to applly a full cromatic / "well-tempered" playing technique to virtuoso the works of Johann Sebastian Bach that were written and rewritten specifically for Gottfried Reiche from 1722 to 1734!
Please see our YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FogyMUViVIo

As my Sopran for the Bach works and Duo Partner the Scarlatti Cantata I have asked the lovely and sensitive German Soprano Carmen Fuggiss to be involved in this project. (Please schroll down to find her Biography and her pictured in Concert in the St. Burkhard Church, Wuerzburg, 2016)
I have a had the great pleasure of working together with Carmen for over thirty years in various CD Recordings and Concerts (involving Orchestra, Piano, Organ, Cembalo and Guitar accompaniment) and have found her to be not only an excellent musician; capable of fine music making in a variety of Gendré, but at the same time to be both a truly inpirational musical personality and  a professionally realiable colleague.                                                                                                      

To support us with the costs for this Project, including the building of the 3 new Tromba da caccia (following the already existing La Tromba Music Productions - Prototype, developed over the past 5 years) I have applied for an "Arts Grant" from the Canadian Council for the Arts, under their special and generous  „Explore and Create: Research and Creation” Grant system.
I am very hopefull that this support will be forthcoming and that it will include the funding for all aspects of this production including the four Soloists, Orchestral Musicians, the preparational Correpetion / Basso continuo personel, as well as the Sound and Film Technicians.

The Time Line for entire Production is as follows:
The production of 3 Tromba da caccia Intruments to be made by the German Horn and Trumpet Maker Christohper Cornford of Darmstadt, Germany, have already begun (on the15th May 2020) and are to very closely follow the existing "La Tromba" Prototype.

In mid-July of 2020 the rehearsals should begin with the other two Tromba da caccia Players, followed in August by the Soloists with B.c.. In September the Orchestra will be added.

The distribution, exhibition dissemination and promotion of this project shall involve Film and Sound recordings that shall be released as both a CD and documentional DVDs, posted on the Richard Carson Steuart You-Tube, Richard Carson Steuart Soundcloud and on La Tromba Music / Webites to be used by International Concert and Promotion Agencies to organise International Tours in the near future,... to amoung countries my own beloved Canada.

To this end I have asked several fine musicians to be involved, including the excellent and very experienced French Trumpet Player, Marc Ullrich. He has agreed to be my second Solo- Tromba da caccia player. I am very pleased to annouce he has agreed to be invovled in alll aspcets of this project!

Mr. Ullrich and the recently deceised and most famous Trumpeter and Music Historian Dr. Eward H. Tarr are just I am, completely convinced that this instrument was (certainly) not a Horn.
This too is the opinion of the German Music Historian Prof. Dr. Karl Dietrich Arnold Schering (1877-1941)(2), Editor of the Bach Year Book / Bach Jahrbuchs from 1904 to 1939 and author of the Article Zu Gottfried Reiches Leben und Kunst / Regarding Gottfried Reiche's Life and Art.
Schering reports that Horn playing, was not a part of “Stadtpfeiffer” duties at that time and continues that it was in fact prohibited by Mandated Law, for the Military Trumpet to be to played by any person or persons other than official “Hof Trumpeters”. He makes direct reference to that which was clearly stated in not one but two “Kurfürschliche Mandaten” / Electorial Mandates, namely the Madates “Against the Unauthrporised Playing of Trumpets and Beating of Miltitray Kettledrums” from 1661, by Chur Fürst Johann Georg and reinforced again in Dresden on the 23rd of July 1711 by his successor “August der Starke”, Elector to Saxonia and later King of Poland, in which he signs as Augustus Rex this specific “Prohibition”. It was therefore clearly forbidden in Saxonia for a common City Musician (even one as highly respected as Bach's Solo-Trumpeter, Gottfried Reiche) to play the Natural- (Military) Trumpet. Hense Reiche must have performed exclusively upon a so called Italian Trumpet or Coiled-Trumpet (also called a Tromba da caccia) and certainly not the protected “Fanfare”- Hof / Military Trumpet that many mistakenly believe he performed on.

Added to this, it is unimaginable for one to consider that Reiche would have ever allowed himself to be painted in an Officially Commssioned City Portrait with any other instrument than that with which he himself regarded most dearly, (although he was as Stadt Pfeiffer contractually required to perform on several instruments, including the Oboe, Cornetto and Violin) and most especially the one had made him quite famous in Leipzig over the previous 25 years of his work for the both the City and in diverse University and Rathhaus Concerts.

Reiche had aswell performed in Cantatas in the Nikolai and Thomas Churches on the Tromba da caccia und for 2 decades before J. S. Bach's arrival in Leipzig in 1723 under Bach's direct predessor, the former “Thomas Church Organist” and "Director Chori Musici Lipisiensis" / Musical Director of the City of Leipzig, Johann Kuhnau (1660-1722).
Kuhnau was from 1701 to his death in 1722 also University Music Director and successor to a further famous Leipzig Church Musician, Johann Schelle.
This means Gottfried Reiche was, through his associations with both Schelle and Kuhnau and in his duties as Stadt Pfeiffer, a very prominent and highly regarded musician long before Johann Sebastian Bach ever arrived in Leipzig.

Having been repeatedly relocated in a number of other locations over the past almost 3 centuries, this extraordinary painting hangs once again in the same building where, employed his entire professional career by the City of Leipzig- ultumately reaching the status of "Senior Stadtmusicus" (Senior Performing City Musician) in 1719, Reiche had performed his daily duties up to his sudden death in 1734.

In the painting he is holding a pure-silver and gold ornamented "Clarino" trumpet in “circular form”, (and please, rememeber it is certainly not a horn!) which for my way of thinking must be, yes, is obviously the true "Bach" trumpet on which he performed Bach's special works... what else can it be?!
In his left hand he is holding an „Abblas“ piece, (perhaps his own composition?,... very probably!) which he performed as his “Encore” (sign off/signature piece) at the end of his Tower music duties. A flashy "fanfare" which he very surely, regularily performed from the "Leipziger Rathhaus Turm", as a part of daily musical duties as Senior Stadt Pfeiffer of the City of Leipzig.

It has been postulated, that because this instrument was made of pure Silver and Gold it was therefore very rare and other wise extremely expensive. I suggest that the instrument could have been a personal gift from King August II to Reiche (for his 60th birthday?) or even from the "Stadt Elders" in high appreciation of “exceptional musical abilities" and/or his continued "loyal service to the Duke of Saxony and King of Poland!” (?)...hence the colours of my Cordel in the Picture of my Instrument at the end of the Home-Page.

Other theories as to the origin of this intrument come for example from the American Scholar and Trumpeter Don L. Smithers, who suggests that perhaps it is a much older instrument, made in the Nuremberg workshops of Johann Leonard Ehe I in the late 17th century or even by another famous Nuremberg instrument maker, Johann Carl Ködisch. Some think it was originally for the Moravian Court of the Markgrafen of Olmuetz, and was most specifically constructed for the use of the Court Composer and Senior Court Trumpeter, Pavel Josef Vejvanovky (1633-1693) the successor to H.I.F.Biber when he went to Salzburg. These postulations, in my opinion, do not "fit" the possible time line and have no real basis of fact, however who really knows!?!.
Further speculations suggest it was even much older instrument and that it was in fact Anton Schnitzer who had built this special trumpet in the late 16th / early 17th century, since Schnitzer had for certain created the most innovative instruments of his time, including the very famous "Pretzel Trumpet" for none other than Caesaré Bendinelli, composer, Trumpet Method author and principal trumpeter at both the Viennese court from 1567 to 1580 and there after at the Bavarian Court in Munich from 1580 until his death in 1617.

These ideas and speculations however interesting and colorfull in nature, are when not historically supported nor documented in any historical texts certainly possible and VERY interesting... atleast to me.

Some specific facts about the Tromba da caccia and it's use in Germany (Saxonia) in te 17th and 18th century are however very clearly documented.

I
Since the German musicologist Michael Praetorius mentions and even clearly illustrates the "Clarino Trumpet" (in Coiled form) in his work "Syntagma Musicum" published in Wolfenbüttel and Wittenberg in three parts between 1614-1620, this kind of Coiled Trumpet was well known and widely performed upon in Europe and this long before Reiche was even born.

II
We know that Reiche performed regularly on this special Clarino instrument in Leipzig.

III
We know too that Cantata 215 "Preise dein Glücke, gesegnetes Sachsen" was written by Johann Sebastian Bach specifically for Reiche to be performed by him on October 5th, 1734. which was the fateful night when he died of exhaustion (heart attack and/or a stroke?) on his way home, following the first performance of this Cantata! 

IV
We know too that the performance took place outside and directly in front of the Historical City Hall in Leipzig and under no less than Johann Sebastian Bach's personal musical direction.

V
We know as well that Reiche was most certainly the Solo Trumpeter for whom Johann Sebastian Bach had written not only this work but as well as all of his most challenging and difficult secular and religious compositions involving the Clarino dating from 1723 through to 1734, including the Christmas Oratorio, even though Reiche died before it was frist performed for the Christams festivities in December of 1734.

VI
There is also no doubt that a very special relationship between these two exceptional musicians began immediately after Bach's arrival in Leipzig in 1723, when Bach assumed the prestigious position of "Director Chori Musici Lipisiensis" (Musical Director of the City of Leipzig), a position he was to maintain until his death in 1750.

VII
We know too that Bach revised several of his previous Cantatas composed in Weimar (and even earlier) to accommodate and even feature Reiche's extraordinary abilities on the Tromba da caccia.

One last and important fact that we are sure of:
The very last musical statement of Reiche's life, as 1st Clarino in the final Coro: "Stifter Reiche, Beherrscher der Kronen" of Cantata 215, was a beautifully lyrical melody.
Here Reiche was allowed to "sing" with his "Clarino" above the whole ensemble.

Such lyrical, obligato parts were typically played on a Tromba da caccia, (circular trumpets in Coiled form) since these parts were necessarily required to be performed in perfect dynamic balance and with unfailing intonation and musical inflection, supporting and often enhancing the Soprano Voice part.

In an attempt to perfect it's construction and understand and revive the original playing technique of the  Coiled Trumpet /Tromba da caccia, I have been seriously researching, building and rebuilding my own version of the "Clarino" trumpet since 2015. I firmly believe that the special musical relationship between Reiche and Bach (although a total of only 11 years!) created the rare historical opportunity for the art of trumpet performance to develop above and beyond it's former limited role of loud and dramatic musical "sound and fury" on the Military Trumpet of that time. To go beyond the usual forceful military fanfare style of the time and to be suddenly set at the forefront of Bach's most sensitive and lyrically interactive musical expressions in both his Sacred Cantatas as well as his worldly works performed in Leipzig from 1723 was the goal of the development of this high art of Clarion playing as propigated by Gottfried Reiche and his colleagues.

Reiche quite obviously had perfected his special musical gifts and highly developed Tromba da caccia playing technique, even before Bach's arrival in Liepzig. However the combination of Bach's music for the trumpet and Reiche's special performaning abilities allowed the beginning of a new and much more lyrical musical role for the Natural Trumpet and this is especially evident in J. S. Bach's Choral Music involving the Tromba da caccia.

Special "Lecture-Concert" and Interview in the "Historical City Hall" in Leipzig on November 18th, 2017. Pleasee our Youtube: Clarino Projekt zu Leipzig

Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project 2017 - J.S. Bach's Solo-Trumpeter, Gottfried Reiche and his Clarino Trumpet a “Tromba da caccia” instrument: it's re-discovery, authentic musical application and newly discovered playing technique.

To see an intensive 5 1/2 minute You-Tube portion of Mr. Steuart's 2 1/2 hour Concert-Lecture, the first of series from this important and grund breaking Lecture and other live Concerts and interviews from "Classic to Jazz"yet to follow, please go to:
Richard Carson Steuart "Clarino Projekt zu Leipzig"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FogyMUViVIo

Or to hear additional "La Tromba" Produced  "Baroque and Classical" Music performed by Richard Carson Steuart please go to Mr. Steuart's brand new SOUNDCLOUD:
Richard Carson Steuart on Soundcloud
This is the first of a series of soundclouds that will be "poco a poco" present by La Tromba Music Productions featuring Mr. Steuart's diverse recordings, often from live performances, in Europe dating back to 1980.

Truly "inspired" by both the mystery behind the famous Elias Gottlob Haussmann portrait of Reiche and of course by Bach's works written specifically for Reiche, many to be specifically played on his special "Clarino" Trumpet, Mr. Steuart decided to have the instrument built anew and at age 60 begin himself to learn to play it!
Since there are no existing "historical" versions of this original instrument from which to make a copy nor any existing original construction plans (other than Elias Gottlob Haussmann"s portrait itself!) Steuart decided to take on this challenge, having the Excellent Instrument Maker, Hand- Craftsman and Accustical Engineer, Mr. Heinz Poggensee of Würzburg, Germany, with whom he has developed several instruments moderen and historic over the past 35 years, to construct the Reiche instrument completely by hand (with no bell or lead pipe mandrels or forms!...yes truly a hand-made prototype!) so as to come as close as possible to the original instrument shown in the painting itself!

After countless hours of both sytematic methodical developments AND the necessary but costly trial and error construction attempts, combined with Mr. Steuart's development of new historically based mouthpieces, lead-pipes and various bell flairs AND of course intensive personal practise, Mr. Steuart sincerely believes he has finally re-created Reiche's original "sound" through his new instrument, mouthpieces AND at the same time has re-discovered
Gottfried Reiche's very special (what mistakenly been dubbed "Hand -Stopping" but is truly a "hand-reflection") playing technique!
Yes!, after almost 300 years he believes he knows exactly how Reiche was able to perform Bach's extremely demanding works on this mysterious and almost forgotten natural trumpet instrument!


"J.S. Bach's Solo-Trumpeter,Gottfried Reiche and his Clarino Trumpet as “Tromba da caccia” Instrument: it's re-discovery, authentic musical application and newly re-discovered playing technique (including what Steuart calls a hand-reflection intonational/tempering techniques) that allows a full cromatic / well tempered tuning and playing technique to be applied to the virtuoso works of Johann Sebastian Bach, written and rewritten specifically for Gottfried Reiche from 1722 to his death in 1734 by Bach himself!"
"Through the building of my own instrument and my personal and direct study, I believe I have finally uncovered the original playing technique of the Tromba da caccia and how Reiche, himself both a respected composer and a highly acclaimed virtuoso on many instruments in jis time, was able to play Johann Sebastian Bach's demanding new works (including the Christmas Oratorio) on this mysterious and today almost forgotten instrument!
My Project "Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project 2020" objective is revive the original performance techniques and true instrumenation of Bach's works written specifically for Gotffried Reiche (and his intrument) and to make a Recording (with Film Documentation) of both the Recording Sessions ("Making of")  and then perform Concerts using the Tromba da caccia instruments together with Historical Baroque Orchestra, Choir and Solo Singers." R.C.Steuart

In case your interested:
What does it say when you "Google" the Wikipedia informational site about all this?:

”The lost art of Baroque trumpet playing...
In the late 1800 and early 1900 many attempts and considerable attention was paid to the high (clarino) register of Bach´s trumpet parts. The use of small modern trumpets in D, F and eventually B-flat piccolo began to give a number of trumpets players like Adolf Scherbaum and others the opportunity of successfully performances of this music.

The first to use a natural trumpet was Walter Holy. By the help of instrument maker Otto Steinkopf, Holy used a copy of the coiled trumpet seen on the Haussman painting of Gottfried Reiche. To help with intonation, Steinkopf ”invented” vent holes.

Don Smithers however, felt that vent holes were incorrect. He started a study of old literature and found clues on how to play the clarino in methods like Cesare Bendinelli´s Tutta L'arte Della Trombetta (c. 1614), Girolamo Fantini´s Modo per imparare a sonare di tromba (1638), Johann Ernst Altenburg´s Versuch einer Anleitung zur heroisch-musikalischen Trompeter- und Paukerkunst, (Halle 1795). Together with John Bowser and Klaus Wogram, Don Smithers conducted (the first!) scientific tests on baroque trumpets using sound spectrographs. He was able to demonstrate how the irregularities in the tubing of handmade trumpets, together with the large mouthpieces (?) then in use, would have made the process of lipping notes into tune "easier" than on an instrument of modern manufacture. (Scientific American, April, 1986)

(However) In an interview with J. Nussbaum in 1988 (International Trumpet Guild Journal),
Smithers said:

”The true art of clarino playing on uncompromised instruments is still a lost art. No one presently occupying space on this planet can play on a first-rate museum specimen from any one of the several collections of historical instruments the kind of music for which Bach, Molter and a number of other 18th-century composer intended”.

My gifted colleague Jean Francois Mandeuf, whom I had invited to perform with me here in Germany (i.e as my Duo-Partner the famous "Ansbacher Bach Tage") and whom I also asked to give a lecture for my "Baroque" Trumpet Class at our Hochschule für Musik (University of Music) here in Wuerzburg, can now play some of the repertoire of the Baroque era and these very convincingly on his Natural Fanfare "Baroque" Trumpets completely without vent holes. Bravo Jean Francois!
In my opinion however, his insistance of the use of very large mouthpieces (which infact of matter were historically intended for use in Military Signal Service and this on "Land and Sea" as well as for Courtly and Processional Fanfare use: for example when Horse-Back Riding, and/or for the "Principal" and "Vulgaro" (Lowest range) trumpet parts of early "improvised Hofische" Trumpet Ensemble work (like that of Caesare Bendinelli Ensembles in both Vienna and Munich in the 16th and early 17 Century and perhaps even by Girolamo Fantini, who never wrote a High in ANY of his works) and certainly NOT for high-range Clarino use, especially in J.S. Bach's works including the second Brandenburg Concerto. This his application of such huge mouthpieces is quite incorrect.
The Clarino Range (
upper register ) of the natural trumpet (or Clarin = "Clear" in English or "Klar" auf Deutsch) is the Range which was repeatedly required by Bach in his works for the 1st Trumpeter and often 2nd Trumpeters, often accending to high E''' and specifically written for and performed on the Tromba da caccia or simply  "Clarino"  in Leipzig, as this instrument was often referred to by Bach himnself.

A point of FACT to underline my thesis and perspective on this subject and for you too to ponder:
Gottfried Reiche, as Senior Stadt Pfieffer was NOT allowed to play a "Fanfare Trumpet" as Mr. Madeuf plays today atall. This privilege was protected by Strict Laws (by no less than Electoral Proclamations!!!) and was reserved exclusively for Hof Trumpeters in Saxonia at that time and this Law prevailed even well after Reiche's and even Bach's death in 1734 and 1750 (very!) respectively.

I myself can (mit "Fug und Recht") claim to be the very last "Chief Stadt Pfeiffer of all of Germany" since on November of 2021 I will be awared a Life-Long-Pension from the Bavarian State (in fact since 2001) and afterwards my posion will not be filled, since when the City of Wuerzburg's Konservatorium für Music was fused with the Hochschule für Musik (State University of Music) in 2001, it was agreed upon that my position would after my leaving the Hochschule für Musik, be dicontinued.
Therefore since septmebr of 2001 I have enjoyed the total feedom of being able to travel the world while continuing to be paid in full and with the Status of "Lehrer für Besonderer Aufgaben und Anlässe" here in Würzburg. Never the less and not wth standing this total freedom I have for example been giving Lectures on diverse subjects for the University, such as 


J. S. Bach und Johann Gottfried Reiche
„Vom Wunder der musikalischen Natur”
– das "Clarino" (Tromba da caccia)  des Johann Gottfried Reiche
together
with invited Guests (such as the Music Historinan Theorist and Composer Helmut M. Timpelan), invited guest Lecturers and performer form other Unveriteis: specificall Allan Cox Prof. from the Vanderbuilt University and through the European "Erasmus Exchange Programme", Prof. John Miller Head of the brass departmen of the Royal (Nothern) College of Music in Mancheter , England and even performed official "Türm Musik" (just as Gottried Reiche did) up until 2004 for the "Tage der Alte Musik" (an International Festival which take place Bi-annually organised here in the University with  Concerts and lectures taking place in the University, City Hall and most espeically in the Prince Bischop of Wuerzburg's Palace... now a "Unesco Hertiage Building" (with enclosing Residenz Park) and where High Level Concert Series regularily take place, such as the world renown Interntional "Mozart Fest", the local and very populat "Residenz Nacht" for which I have had the great pleasure of being engaged to perform several times and this in diverse "Musical Genre" presenting music from Girolamo Fantini, Giuseppi Tartini, G.F.Händel and J.S.Bach to Maurice Ravel, Astor Piazolla and George Geshwin's Rhapsody in Blue and (and even singing!) selctions from Porgy and Bess. 

As my Soprano Voice Duo-Partner I have asked the lovely and very talented South German Soprano Carmen Fuggiss to be involved in this new project. I have had the great pleasure of working together with Carmen for over thirty years in a number of diverse CD Recordings and Concerts (involving Orchestra, Piano, Organ, Cembalo and even Guitar accompaniment) and have found her to be not only an excellent musician; capable of exceptional music making in a variety of Géndres, but also to be an extremely sensitive and at the same time truly realiable colleague, quite completely without "allures" and the "Diva" problematic so often associated with Singers at her very high level of "hard earned" and "broad spektrum" experince and true Artisic achievement!
She has indeed been a repeated "musical inspiration" to me and other colleagues in both Concerts and Recordings for more than 3 decades and I am delited to say she will continue be one for US ALL during this important new 2020 project!


Artisic Biography of  Carmen Fuggiss:
Ms. Fuggiss grew up in Freiburg, where at the age of 15 she sang in the choir of the Städtische Bühnen (City Theater).
She was active in radio recordings and solo appearances and worked with Anneliese Rothenberger at the ZDF (Second German Television Station) in 1983.

She studied at the music academies in Karlsruhe and Frankfurt in Germany, where Armand MacLane-Lanier her most influential teacher and thereafter at the Mozarteum Salzburg, Austria with Hanna Ludwig. Majoring in Singing, Piano and Opera.After completing her studies, she began her artistic career at Mainfranken Theater Würzburg and at the Nationaltheater Mannheim.
In 1993 she received an engagement at the State Opera in Hanover, where she has worked as a lyrical coloratura soprano with a focus on parts from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to Richard Strauss. In addition, she distinguished herself in parts of the Italian subject. Her most important opera roles include Pamina (The Magic Flute), Susanna (The Marriage of Figaro), Constance (The Abduction from the Seraglio), Lucia (Lucia di Lammermoor), Gilda (Rigoletto), Sophie (The Rosenkavalier), Zerbinetta (Ariadne on Naxos) ), Alban Bergs Lulu and Aribert Reimanns Melusine.
In numerous radio and television productions, Carmen Fuggiss has shown her versatility in various genres from the Middle- Ages to the modern and from Jazz and Soft Rock to Chanson.
Carmen Fuggiss has worked with among other Conductors Georg Solti, Michael Gielen, Kent Nagano, Fabio Luisi, Semjon Bytschkow, Lothar Zagrosek, Heinrich Schiff, Hubert Soudant and Ingo Metzmacher.

 

 


I have asked my long time friend and colleague, the excellent and very experienced French Trumpet Player, Marc Ullrich to be my second Solo- Tromba da caccia player and I am very please to annouce he has agreed to be invovled in this special project!

Marc Ullrich began studying the trumpet with René Christ, a professor in the Mulhouse Conservatory, his home town in Alsace. Awarded the "Prix d'Excellence" in 1969, he continued his studies in the Conservartoire Régional de Versailles in the class of Roger Delmotte, Solo Trumpeter in the Paris Opera. Receiving the "Premier Prix" in 1970, he joined the class of Maurice André's at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris.
In 1971 he became Principal Trumpeter of the Orchestre Symphonique de Mulhouse: part of the Opéra du Rhin ( Mulhouse, Colmar and Strasbourg ).


In 1977 he was appointed Solo Trumpeter of the Radiosinfonieorchester Basel and in 1982 he began to study Baroque Trumpet with Prof. Edward H. Tarr at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis. Soon thereafter he particpated in many concerts together with Dr. Tarr as both Soloist and Trumpet Ensemble Member throughout Europe, and participated in diverse recordings. (Archive, Erato, Nonesuch, etc.). He was also Edward H. Tarr's regular Teaching Assistant in the Schola Cantorum in Basel, Switzerland. In 2019 he retired from Orchestral work with the Radiosinfonieorchester Basel after 42 years of service.
Marc Ullrich has aswell played numerous concerts , many theref of recorded by Naxos in the series "The Art of the Baroque Trumpet".

I have worked with Marc since 1982 and recorded several CDs and performed numerous Concerts with him as both his duo partners on Baroque and Modern trumpet as well as under my Musical direction of the Deutsche Kammer Solisten (German Chamber Soloists) Chamber Orchestra. He has since 1999, been a regular performing and recording member of my Fürstbischöfliches Bläser Consortium (Prince Bischop of Wuerzburgs Wind Ensemble).

Mr. Ullrich is a co-founder of various chamber ensembles, including the “Baroque” Chamber Orchestra "La Follia" For almost fourty years he has played the entire Baroque repertoire for one or more trumpets and strings on Modern Trumpet with this ensemble, recording in France. (Arion, Lyrinx). In Germany he performed with the International Brass Virtuosi” Brass Ensemble lead by me and with which we were awarded a Prize in 1986 at the Narbonne International Brass Ensemble Competition from a Jury headed by Maurice André.
In 1999 Ullrich toured throughout Europe with the Monteverdi Choir, accompanied by the English Baroque Soloists, under John Elliot Gardiner, as part of the J.S. Bach Pilgrimage. He performed exclusively on the “Vented” Baroque Trumpet with amoung other Baroque Trumpeters, Niklas Eklund.
Particularly noteworthy are the Live recordings of all of these concerts at Archiv, including the live recording (DVD) of the Christmas Oratorio in the Herderkirche in Weimar in 1999 performed on the
Vented” Baroque Trumpet."

I asked Marc to write something about our past musical cooperations and he wrote:
I, Marc Ullrich,was asked by Mr. Steuart to write a very short summary of my Professional musical cooperation(s) with himover the past 40 years, a most pleasurable request, that I herewith gladly fulfill.
I first met Mr. Steuart during the German International Classical Trumpet (ARD Radio and Television) Competition in September of 1980 of which he was the winner, and where we be came instant friends!
When I met him again in 1981 when he
had just played in a Concert in Basel as, once again the winner of this second most
famous
Classical Trumpet Competion; the
Geneve (Swiss International Radio and Televison Solo Trumpet Competition) he invited me to perform with him as his Duo -Partner for concerts in Munich, Germany.
Our first Concerts were “Gala Concerts” in the Historical “Hercules Saal” in the Munich Residenz "Hercules Saal"
performing Baroque works for two Modern Trumpets: Vivaldi, Biber, Mannfredini, etc., together with Munich Chamber Orchestra conducted by Hans Stadelmaier.
In 1985 he formed what he named the International Brass Virtuosi (a Brass Qunitett with mebr for Australia, the USA,
Canada (him) and of course France, me) and invited me to be his Trumpet 
"Co-leader" for both Concerts and CD recordings.With this ensemble we won a Prize at the International Brass Quintett Competion in Narbonne, France in 1986 with my former teacher Marice André as the Jury Chairman.

Over the past 40 years he has repeatedly invited me to perform and record with him in various Ensemble Projects that he
has initiated and lead from Large Trumpet Ensembles and Modern Brass Quintetts perfoming on Modern Instruments to various forms of Chamber Music on both Period (Historical) and Modern instruments. During this whole time we also performed several Concerts with Organ and Chamber Orchestral accompaniment. In 2015 I performed in an extended Concert Series as both Soloist and Mr. Steuart's Duo Partner commemorating his 50 Years of Professional Musical Performance.

During the entire time I have known Mr. Steuart, he has repeatedly amazed me with his high level of most serious and professional musical leadership as well as his exceptional organisational abilities. He has at the same time continually inspired me by his exceptionally intensive, musical creativity!
He has recently visited me here in France and presented to
me his exciting prototype "Tromba da caccia", Coiled Trumpet Intrument, which I believe is a truly excellent replica of the original Tromba da caccia pictured in the famous Oil- Portrait of Gottfried Reiche.
Mr. Steuart has repeatedly and very convincingly
demonstrated to me his re-discovered historical playing technique on this little known nor professionally played instrument, using amoung other techniques, his newly rediscovered "hand-refection" intonational and phasing technique.
I am therefore most pleased that Mr.Steuart has once again invited me to be involved in his newest, "Clarino / Natural Trumpet / Tromba da caccia Project", which I firmly believe promises to be a very important international contribution to Historical Trumpet Research and Performance.

 

 

The rehearsals with recording shall begin on the 12 of October in St. Burkhard Church (from the 8th Century!) in Wuerzburg and continue to the 15 of October.
 

The Concert is to take place on the 17th in St. Burkhard Church in Wuerzburg.

As Concert Master and String Specialist, I have asked Professor Doctor Pauline Nobes of London, England to lead the Baroque String Ensemble for this project that she will personally organise to this end.

Prof. Dr.
Pauline Nobes, Baroque violin, Leader:

Pauline Nobes is recognised as one of Europe’s foremost specialists in historical performance practice. She has recorded and performed extensively with ensembles such as The English Baroque Soloists, The English Concert and as leader for The Academy of Ancient Music, Kölner Akademie and Musica Antiqua Köln.
Pauline guest leads Das Neue Orchester and opera orchestras including Frankfurt and Madrid.


Her passion for teaching continues as Professor for Baroque violinat the Musikhochschule Würzburg (Germany) and at the Royal Northern College of Music. She was recently awarded the position of Extraordinary Professor at Stellenbosch University (South Africa).
Pauline’s Ph. D. research
focused on the unaccompanied solo violin repertory before 1750.
Her on going research reveals
‘Musick’ in Manchester from 1744/45.
Pauline started her exceptional musical life as a brass player: these beginnings are not forgotten: she recorded the solo trumpet role in Beethoven's Leonore with Sir John Eliot Gardiner‘s
Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique after concerts in Salzburg and New York.


I asked Pauline to write something about our past cooperation and she wrote:

My name is Pauline Nobes and I am head of the Baroque Faculty of Music at the Hochschule für Musik (University of Music) in Wuerzburg, Germany. I have as well taught for over 2 decades at among other Musical Institutions the Royal Northern College of Music, in Manchester, England. I have known Mr. Steuart since 2005 when I first came to the University here in Germany as Baroque Violin teacher. I have found him to be a amiable and conscientious colleague.
We have taught and performed together in various projects both within and outside of the University here during this time I have also heard Mr. Steuart in diverse Solo Concerts when he has performed on both Modern and Historical Instruments. I have also seen portions of his brilliant Lecture - Recording in Leipzig in November of 2017, presenting and demonstrating among other instruments his new and exciting Tromba da caccia replica and was personally present at his fascinating Lecture here at the University of Music in Wuerzburg  entitled :
Johann Sebastian Bach und Johann Gottfried Reiche - „Vom Wunder der musikalischen Natur” .

He very convincingly defended his Thesis of “Hand Reflection” as a technique used on the Tromba da caccia by amoung others but most especially Gottfried Reiche both in and before J.S. Bach's time as  "Kirchen Music Leiter" in Leipzig.
I am therefore very pleased to be invited by him to be involved as both Concert Master and String Ensemble Leader for his Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project, which I firmly believe to be very important regarding the furthering of Historical Trumpet Research and Performance, most especially for the works of Johann Sebastian Bach from 1723 to 1734 !
*
Reference to:“Gesprächskonzert” January, 2018: University of Music Wuerzburg

J. S. Bach und Johann Gottfried Reiche
„Vom Wunder der musikalischen Natur” – das "Clarino" (Tromba da caccia)  des Johann Gottfried Reiche

Richard Carson Steuart, Tromba da caccia
Helmut M. Timpelan (Musikforscher), Cembalo

https://www.helmut-timpelan.de/kompositionen-i-eigenverlag/

 

 

 

I too have been very fortunate in having recently received notice of the definative acceptance of my invitaion to take part in this Special Project by two excellent Male singers: namley Kenneth Beal of Canada and Sven Fürst of Franconia/Germany, both of whom I have previously lead and very enjoyably worked with in past Projects,... most esepcially in 2014 in DOUBLE "Live Concerts / Recordings" of Georg Friedrich Haendel's "Judas Macccabeus" and J. S. Bach's Kanate "Auf Christi Himmelfahrt allein" (BWV 128) and in which Carmen Fuggiss also performed the beautifull Kanate"Jauchzet Gott in allen landen" (BWV 51) together with me.

 

Kenneth Beal, Tenor:
was born in Canada. He finished his Education at the University of Western Ontario (B.Mus. and B.Ed.) and the University of Toronto (Master of Music and a Diploma in Opera Performance).
His European Debut came at the 'Rossini Festival' with the Frankfurt Kammeroper where he sang the Role of Dorvil from the Opera La Scala di Seta. In the same year he signed a permanent Contract with the Mainfranken Theater Wuerzburg where he is still working today.

His Vocal performing ranges from Opera to Oratorio and Art Song. Very soon after his Graduation, he made his first Recording for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). He was also a Finalist in the CBC National Music Competition. Kenneth was engaged with the L'Atelier lyrique de L'Opéra de Montréal where he sang such Roles as Rodolfo in Puccini's La Boheme, Ferrando in Mozart's Cosi fan tutte , Don Ramiro in Rossini's La Cenerentola, Edgardo in Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor and also Nemorino in L'Elisir d'amore.

He performed in numerous Oratorios such as Rossini's Stabat Mater, Bach's St. John's Passion and St. Mathew's Passion, Haydn's Die Schöpfung , Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and Handel's The Messiah.

In Wuerzburg, as well as in many other larger Theaters in Germany, Kenneth has sung such Roles as, Camille de Rossillon from Lehar's The Merry Wives of Winsor, Belmonte in Mozart's Enführung aus dem Serail and Faust from Gounod's Faust.

Since 1999 Kenneth has as well held the Position of Voice Teacher at the University of Wuerzburg.

Sven Fürst, Bass:
Sven Fürst studied in the singing class of Prof. Monika Bürgener at the University of Music / Würzburg and completed the advanced training class with honors in 2002. He visited the Master Classes of Prof. Ingeborg Hallstein and Prof. Helmut Deutsch, participating in various CD productions and radio recordings. Sven Fürst is the First Prize Winner of the 1999 Armin Knab competition, winner of the “Debut in Meran” competition in 2005, was scholarship holder of the Richard Wagner Society in 2000 and is a regular Jury Member of the National German Student Competition (“Jugend musiziert” ).
Sven Fürst maintains extensive concert activity in Germany with a repertoire that includes Oratorial works from Early Baroque to Modern, works with orchestras such as the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra, the Prague Philharmonic Orchestra or the Baden-Baden Symphony Orchestra, 
aswell as with the Würzburg Oratorio Choir and the Würzburg Monteverdi Choir. Sven Fürst has been a guest at the theaters in Würzburg, Koblenz, Eisenach and Meiningen.

As a member of the Junge Oper Köln he sang the father in "Hansel and Gretel", Papageno in the "Magic Flute" and Guglielmo in Mozart's "Cosi".In 2010 he made his Switzerland debut at Theater St. Gallen in the production of Benjamin Switzerland's opera "Jakob von Gunten".
Sven Fürst presently holds a Position of Voice Teacher at the University of Wuerzburg.
 

Richard Carson Steuart: Trumpet, Ensemble and
Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project 2020 Initiator and Musical Director 

Born in Weyburn, Canada in 1956, RICHARD CARSON STEUART has performed professionally as both a classical and jazz soloist since the age of 10. At 64, he continues to enjoy astoundingly robust health and a diverse musical career, now spanning more than five decades!

Besides the famous French trumpet virtuoso, Maurice André, Richard Carson Steuart is the only winner of both of the world’s most prestigious trumpetcompetitions: the German – ARD, International Radio and Television Classical Music Competition (held every six years in Munich) and the Swiss – STR “Concours L’Exécution de Musique Genève” / International Radio and Television Music Competition (which was held in Geneva and now no longer exists).

He is, as well, the winner of the Bavarian Motor Works (BMW) Modern Music Festival Prize awarded every two years at the Munich “Biennale”. This international modern music festival was headed at that time by the recently deceased, internationally acclaimed composer, Hans Werner Hense. All three of these early career achievements (from 1980, 1981, and 1990 respectively) most clearly demonstrate Mr. Steuart’s Artistic Niveau as well as his musical diversity as a world class solo trumpeter.

After working on this project for five years, Steuart believes he has, through his own disapplined and methodical study, (re)discovered the true historical playing technique of the Tromba da caccia instrument and is now willing and able to share this special knowledge with "the trumpet world"!

His first Clarino Lecture-Concert took place in the "Historical City Hall" in Leipzig, Germany on the 18th of November 2017, the exact location where Johann Gottfried Reiche served his regular musical duties right up to the day of his sudden death in 1734. 
Mr. Steuart reports he has examined and personally tested several Tromba da caccia instruments from makers who have quite seriously attempted to construct such a Clarino instrument in the past. Two of the best of these, he says, were both made in Leipzig and are infact on display in the Grazzi Museum and in the Old City Hall Museum of Leipzig even today. They are from the excellent workshops of Syhre in Leipzig in the 1980s and Voigt of Markt Neukirchen in the late 1950s.

Although Syhre of Leipzig and Egger of Basel, Switzerland not to forget to mention Markus Rachet of Bamberg (who too built an excellent copy of a much later dated intrument, originally from Balthasar Fürst of Ellwangen - 1770, now on display in the German National Museum in Nuermberg) succeeded in building quite "playable" instruments of this kind, it is in truth virtually quite impossible to reconstruct a superlative instrument of any kind, historical nor modern without direct interaction and cooperation with truly experienced, virtuoso performers. Ones who first and foremost clearly understand an instrument original playing techniques and musical applications.

Since no modern Artist at his level has made the concerted effort to first build and then actually learn to play this special original instrument before, it was necessary for Mr. Steuart to start from the very beginning in his research.

Fine artist / historians and innovators of the past, like the late Walter Holy of Köln, Germany and most importantly, Donald Leroy Smithers of New York City, U.S.A., should be clearly mentioned here, to show "do respect" for their individual, ground-breaking contributions regarding a clear understanding of the original Clarino Tromba da caccia Intrument and it's playing potential.  They two, are to be respectfully noted as the most important sources of both Historical as well as Practical Performance Information on the Tromba da caccia. Both were true inspirations for Steuart's Clarino Project zu Leipzig, even though neither of these excellent Artists had ever used "hand reflextion" in coordination with tounge and mouth compression techniques in their performances on similar Coiled Trumpets in their time(s).

Steuart says, "it is not only difficult and strenuous to play the natural trumpet musically with or without the non-authentic "well tempered" intonation holes commonly used today, it also requires all the intelligence, experience and sensitivity that a seasoned and serious High Brass playing musician can muster. Therefore most professional trumpeters find it too tedious to spend the necessary time to first understand and then appreciate the Clarino or Tromba da caccia (Hunting Trumpet) which is the true Bach Trumpet, let alone try to master it and then to perform in public on it.
It therefore should be clearly understood that only through the combination of several physical prerequisites and specific technical performance  knowleadge, as well as years of patient practice, can this instrument be truly mastered!"
He adds, " the Clarino trumpet is an extremely "dangerous" intrument to perform on at the best of times, because like any natural instrument it is difficult to "control" in the high register, (especially without any intonation holes nor slides nor keys of any kind, just as the intrument was originally played ) and both excellent ear training and an advanced emboucher and breathing development are absolutely necessary to perform consistently on this extremely sensitive instrument. Added to this and most importantly, a deep understanding and application of the both tounge positioning techniques and my newly rediscovered Hand-Reflextion technique, cannot be circumvented if one wishes to master this fine instrument and to authenically play Bach's demanding works on it!
"This" he concludes "is the ultimate challenge when playing the "Clarino" Trumpet!"There are neither hand-written technical descriptions, printed method books, nor any historical performance explanations as to how this Tromba da caccia instrument was originally played.
The famous Baroque Trumpet Virtuoso Girolamo Fantini (1600-1675) did however offer in his a method of "extraordinary tonal productions" in
his "Modo per Imparare a Sonare di Tromba" (first printed in Francofort, 1938), explaining how he through a very interesting form of "Tounge Positioning" produced through using the pronounciations of "Syllables"1) when playing the Natural Trumpet! 
The use of vowel innuciation is a very important aspect of authentic musical interpertation in many aspects in music making on the Trumpet (including modern Jazz on the Modern "Valved"-Trumpet ) and most especially on the Natural Trumpet in the "Baroque" musical period!
1)
syllable is described  in "Wikipedia " as "a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds. It is typically made up of a syllable nucleus (most often a vowel) with optional initial and final margins (typically, consonants. Syllables are often considered the phonological "building blocks" of words.They can influence the rythm of a language, its prosody, its poetic metre and its stress patterns.".


The recently deseased Scholar and Master Baroque Trumpeter Dr. Dr. Eward H.Tarr, was long time colleague and friend of Mr. Steuart with whom he not only played togther in numerous Concerts but also gave diverse Lectures with regards to both the modern and the Barqoue Trumpet in Germany in the late 1990s and the early 2000s.
Tarr directly quotes Fantini in his forward to his Musica Rara Edition of Fantini's "8 Sonatas" from 1971:

"Certain notes (in these Sonatas) which have not been listen at the beginning of (this method), which, if you were to hold them, would be imperfect, but, since they go by rapidly, can be accepted" ("Si trovaeranno alune note, che nel prinicpio dell'opera non sono accente, chea voler fermavisi sono imperfette, ma perche passano presto possono servire")
At that time (1971) it was Dr. Tarr's steadfast opinion that Girolamo Fantini did not play the Tromba da caccia, atleast not with Hand- Refection (stopping the bell) techniques and that it was ONLY Fantini's "gift" (special ability) for producing notes "foreign to the harmonic series" by the simple means of "lipping" that allowed him to produce such "extraordinary" notes.
 

This opinion was even at that time in direct opposition to both that of the BelgianMusic-Historian François-Joseph Fétis (1784-1881) as stated in his compilation of biographical data in the "Biographie universelle des musiciens" (published in 1834) and that of the German Scholar, Heinrich Eichborn in his comments regarding Fantini Performing abilities in his most informative work: 'Die Trompete,' from 1881 as quoted in George Grove's Dictionary from 1900! (Please, this "Die Trompete" is not to be confused with Edward Tarr's very successfull book printed in the 1980s and with the exact same title!)

However, almost 50 years later and after practical demonstrations and personal discussions with Mr. Steuart beginning in 2017, Mr. Tarr held (Mr. Steuart's) Thesis of Hand-Refelection as indeed a quite "plausible authentic Playing Technique of that time", even for Fantini (and perhaps even for Caesare Bendinelli?!), since had Dr. Tarr not passed away in early 2020 he too would have infact been a part of this new Tromba da caccia Project 2020, and if not as a performer because of his health problems, then certainly in an "Advisory Capacity"!
Very fortunately for Mr. Steuart and his Project, Dr. Tarr's most successfull former student and "Right-Hand Man" for over 40 years on the Baroque Trumpet, the exceptional French Trumpeter Mr. Marc Ullrich, has agreed to be actively involved in this project, in Dr. Tarr's stead, may he REST IN PEACE in (Trumpet ) Heaven! 

 

J. S. Bach's works are truly the ultimate challenge when playing the Tromba da caccia, and most especially in the Clarino range together with a very sensitve and light Soprano Voice Duo Partner as Carmen Fuggiss! (pictured here in a one of my "Motherday Concerts", performing of amoung other "High Baroque" Duo -Works, J.S. Bach's Kantate 51 "Jauchzet Gott in allen landen!" together with me).

This took Concert place in the St. Burkhard Church with Dr. Klaus Linsenmeyer of Hochberg / Wuerzburg as Positiv-Orgel accompanist.
Dr. Linsenmeyer is an accomplished Internationally acclaimed Concert Solist (a former student of Karl Richter) and was for 25 years my main accompanist for Organ and Trumpet Concerts. He graciously accompanied me "Pro Bono" on a Benifit Tour to Canada in 2016. We performed an number of concerts and I gave Free Lecture/ Master Clasess at two Universities and 5 Workshops at both Junior and Senior High Schools with all preceeds going to a diverse number of Charities for the support of special  and deadicated organisations that help Abused and Neglected Children, as well for other "Needy Persons" in my home Province of Saskatchewan.





It was following a series of my (very early) performance in 1970 of among other works “Let the Bright Seraphim” from Handel's Samson together with the internationally acclaimed Canadian Vocal Artist Maureen Forrester (1) then Chair Person of the Canadian Council for the Arts, and through an extenisve Tour to amoung other ciities London, England (as both Assitant Conductor and Soloist in amoung other work the Josef Haydn Concert in Eb and G.F. Haendel's Messiah in historical venues such the Westminster Abbey, that I when I returned to Canada I was engaged to recorded among other Baroque works for Solo Trumpet: the Purcell Sonata in D, Purcell's ( or rather what now is widely believed to be John Stanley's) “Trumpet Tune” and the famous Torelli “8G” Sonata (origanilly for Tromba and Strings). Stard repertoire granted but to record these at the tender age of 14 on the Modern D Trumpet with piano accompaniment for the CBC Radio, Regina. (Radio Producer: Rudi Blancher) was no easy taks for me since the high Trumpet (even the D trumpet) was new for me.

(1)
Maureen Kathleen Stewart Forrester, CC, O.ON, OQ, opera and recital singer, teacher, arts administrator (born 25 July 1930 in Montreal, QC; died 16 June 2010 in Toronto, ON). Maureen Forrester was one of Canada’s greatest and best-known classical singers. She was renowned for her remarkable
trumpet-like contralto and her deeply emotive musical interpretations. The only classical performer other than Glenn Gould to be inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, she was admired greatly at home and abroad for her recitals, recordings and opera performances. She also served as chair of the Canada Council for the Arts, director of du Maurier Arts and chancellor of Wilfrid Laurier University.


Still, and ever since then, I have been fascinated by the Baroque repertoire with voice and most especially the works of Johann Sebastian Bach and have since my relocation in 1978 to Europe recorded among other of Bach's works, his Second Brandenburg Concerto all be it on the Piccolo Trumpet due to the Modern Intrumental accompaniment.
This is an especially noteworthy recording which was done “Live” in the Historical Chapel of the Cadolzburg (
Burg des Kadold) near Fuerth, Lower Franconia in which I also engaged to perform the (historical) Guiseppe Torelli "Sonata con Tromba" (Roger Etienne) on the vented Baroque Trumpet in Modern pitch during the the same programm. I always love a real challange, it brings the best out of me!
This special
Historical Chapel was in itself very inspiring since it dates back to 1157 when the "Reeve of Kadolzburg", Helmericus de Kadoldesburc, agreed on a territorial exchange between the Diosise of Wuerzburg and the Abbey of Heilbronn.
The Castle was in turn (in the year 1397) given, together with “all the land under the mountains" (“... untergebirgisch”), including the residence of Cadolzburg, to Fredrick VI who 20 years later received the Margraviate of Brandenburg and the added elivating title Elector of Brandenburg.

It is his dynasty would later become the Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire of Germany.


As Solo Trumpeter of the Bamberg Symphony (Originaly the German Prague Symphony Orchestra up to 1945) that Johann Nepomuck Hummel and even before him  W.A. Mozart had performed with)  I also became co-leader and founder of the Large German Brass Ensemble (beginning in the fall of 1979) with which I recorded an all J. S. Bach CD in 1985 (EMI-Electrola: “Bach 300”) together with the original Core Quintet Enrique Crespo (Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchetra), Wolfgang Gaag (Munich Philharmonic) Konradin Groth (Berlin Philharmonic) and Walter Hilger (Hamburg Opera Orchestra). All of the works on this CD were masterfully arranged by Enrique Crespo and performed by a large (10 member) Brass Ensemble which was expanded and involved the leading Brass Soloists from the top German Symphonic Orchestras of that time (including members of the Berlin Philharmonic, Bavarian Radio, Hamburg Radio and Opera Orchestras, Stuttgart Radio and the Bamberg Symphony Orchestras, respectively) and was recorded exclusively on modern Orchestral instruments.

A brief aside, if I may:
Leading my own Munich Brass Ensemble (formed in 1983) I was very fortuate to have pefromed at yet a even higher level than even that with the Germann Brass, giving special Concerts on a National and even International level, often without ever having to leave Germany itself: for example for the International Porsche Club in Wuerzburg, the European Heart Surgeons Conference and even for the 18th G7(actucally G8) Conference which took place in 1992 in Munich with  the Russian President, Boris Yeltsin as "Guest" Head of the Russian State at the Conference with for the first time after the fall of the Iron Curtin and Berlin Wall.
He attended together with the seven Heads of State: George W. H. Busch, Brian Mulroney, John Majors, Francois Mitterran, Helmuth Kohl, Juliano Amato and
Kiichi Miyazawa (with Jacques Delors as European Commission President also in attendance).
We perfomed pieces specially arranged or newly written (with added cerimonial fanfares) for each of the attending heads of State including Strike Up The Band from George Gerwin which brough President George H.W. Busch into a strut ste as he came down the Red Carpet and the Introduction to the 4th Symphony of P. I. Tchaikovsky form a HIGH TOWER as a Fanfare for Boris Yeltsin when he first arrived at the Resindenz in Munich moving in his in his usual joyously colourful and this time dramatic fashion. I remebred back to fact Cesare Bendinelli had performed there wher we stood from1580 to 1625 as the King of Bavaria's Head Trumpeter and Diplomat for such festivities in his time!
Mr. Majors togther with his whole troup stood at attention, saluted  and loudly sang 4 verses of "Land of hope and Glory" with us and Preisdent Miyazawa
(宮澤 喜) even took the time to personally come to me, only to shank my hand and thank me in English, saying "Thank you, thank you for playing a Japanese Song for me!" He confieded in me that he felt "much more at home and comfortable" because of us and esepcially enjoyed the piece "Yaki Bushi" which he recognised and knew very well.
Such experinces are special of course and quite unforgetable and remind me once again of the true power of music as a Language of "Soft" DIPLOMACY!.

Having privately studied the “vented” Baroque Trumpet beginning in the second half of the 1980's I applied for a Canada Council Advanced Studies Grant and took private Master Class lessons in London (from Michael Laird), Linz (from Friedemann Immer) and Basel (from Edward H.Tarr) and in fulfillment of that Study Grant I recorded my first “Historical Trumpet” Solo CD in 1988/89 simply entitled “La Tromba”, on which I performed works for both Modern and Baroque Trumpet while conducting all of the Ensembles and full Orchestras involved. Works that are most notable with respect to my pervious work on the Baroque trumpet are: Giovnanni Bonaventura Viviani's “Sonata per Tromba Solo” with Orgen Accomp.; G.F.Handel's “Let the Bright Seraphim” from Samson with Soprano and Organ Accomp.; Arcangelo Corelli's “Sonata per Tromba e due Violino e B. c. in D Dur with only 2 violins, a Cello and Cembalo Accomp. Leopold Mozart's “Konzert für Trompete und Orchestra” in D Dur I recorded with full 25 member Baroque Chamber Orchestra accompaniment.

Since then and especially since 2015 I have been concentrating not only on the construction of my own Tromba da caccia, built after Haussmann's Painting of Gottfired Reiche from 1726 but also have added my considerations to the “construction plans” that I had purchased from the “Germanische National Museum” in Nueremburg in the early 1980s.
These construction plans depict a “Jäger Trumpet” attributed to the workshop of Balthasar Fuerst from 1770 and even though these specific construction plans (unsigned but probably done by Robert Barkley in 1977/78) are admittedly of an Intrument built more than 50 years later than that held by Reiche in Haussmann's Portriat, all possible first hand historical information as to the proper construction of such an instrument is I believe necessary.
As too, was my special opportunity to look closely at and even briefly perform on an excellent replica of a Tromba da caccia which was brought to me directly out of the Grazzi (Leipziger University) Museum for me to present at my Concert-Lecture in the “Historical Rathaus” which took place on the 18
th of November 2017.
Please see a portion of this LIVE lecture concert on YouTube:
Richard Carson Steuart - Clarino Projekt zu Leipzig Part 1

Although this Instrument came directly to me out of one of the museum's Glass Display-Cases and was infact built in Markt Neukirchen for the Leipzig Museum in 1957 as a copy of a no longer existing Historical instrument made in the Pfeiffer workshop in 1697, I was able to play it without any preparation usins Hand reflection. Infact it allowed remarkable response and excellent intonation when I completely spontaneously performed on it that afternoon. The major differences between this special replica and various other instruments made in Germany at the time of Reiche and Bach, are most notably it's very small (modern horn-sized) mouthpiece “shank” and corresponding mouthpiece with respective (extremely) small throat bore (ca, 3,00 mm), and large flat “Trumpet like” cup shape and it's conical lead-pipe, extending well into the main bore of the instrument.
This does not mean it should be confused with a “Horn” of any kind, since the Bell size and shape and mouthpiece cup shape are typically “Trumpet like”. It's construction rather is almost as if it were to be desribed as quite “Modern” in form.
It should be noted that Modern piston-valve trumpets have very similar conical Lead-pipes and Bell shapes as this Pfeiffer model and variation of a Tromba da caccia. This which allows it to be played in the higher over tone range, that is easily up to C'' and beyond by some specialists.
And this is exactly what Reiche and many of his colleagues at that time was required to do: play accurately and securely up into 19
th and 20th and even, in the famous 2nd Brandenburg Concerto, up to the 21 and 22 Overtone / Partial on an instrument completely without valves or slides or holes or keys of any kind... a truly “Natural” Trumpet. But how was this possible?

From the numerous writings by Historical Music Scholars on the subject of the Tromba da caccia and it's musical application before and during the time of J. S. Bach, I have build my Thesis and in fact my Instrument itself and on the most probable use by Gottfried Reiche of the Tromba da caccia (coiled trumpet) as his main High Brass Instrument using hand reflection. Astute observations and writings have been made by both the German Musicologist Karl Dietrich Arnold Schering (2) (1877-1941) in his work; “ Zu Gottfried Reiches Leben und Kunst” and the American Trumpeter and Music Historian Don Leroy Smithers (*1933) in his most revealing work; ”Gottfried Reiches Ansehen und sein Einfluß auf die Musik Johann Sebastian Bachs Leben und Werk” (Bach-Jahrbuch 73, 113–150, 1987 ) about the Baroque Trumpet and it's influence and importance in earlier Musical Eras.

To these most important observation and developments I suggest a return to the contribution that Reiche's early use (perhaps even first application therefore his “research and creation”?) of what was much later applied and highly documented as a “Hand- Stopping” technique for the “Wald” Horn and the curved Straight Trumpet of the Early Classical period. This Hand Refection technique and his other wise exceptional performing abilities was I believe his greatest contribution to the ART of Trumpet performance at that time. This technique was used by orchestral Trumpeters and Horn Soloists of the Early Classical and Romantic musical Eras to both phrase, articulate and most importantly perfectly “intonate” the demanding music written for their instruments by Mozart and even Beethoven and this for their respective Orchestral and Solo works from the end of the 18th and well in to the the 19th Century.
The
Clarino Trumpet is an extremely "dangerous" intrument to perform on at the best of times, because, like any natural resonating instrument it is difficult to "control" in the high register, (especially without any intonation holes nor slides nor keys of any kind, just as the Tromba da caccia” was originally played) and both excellent ear training and an advanced emboucher and breathing development were and still are absolutely necessary to perform consistently on this extremely sensitive instrument.
Added to this and most importantly, a deeper understanding and application of the both Tounge Positioning techniques (so called “Lipping“ or in German “Treiben and Fallenlassen” of tones to improve intonation) and the Hand- Reflextion technique that I propose cannot be circumvented if, in my opinion, one wishes to master this difficult instrument and to authentically perform Bach's demanding works on it successfully!


Since there are neither hand-written technical descriptions, printed method books, nor any historical performance explanations as to how this Tromba da caccia instrument was originally played, I firmly believe, after working on this project for almost five years, that only through very methodical study, together with 2 and more Tromba da caccia playing Colleagues, will I be able able to perform the works of J. S. Bach using both the “hand- reflection” (quasi stopping) and other original historical playing techniques and through this further practical study eventually be able to share the superlative musical qualities of this special instrument and it's technical playing knowledge, with the modern music world!

(2)
Karl Dietrich Arnold Schering (born April 2, 1877 in Breslau, † March 7, 1941 in Berlin) was a German musicologist and music critic. Schering grew up in Dresden as the son of the art publisher Garl Gustav Schering, who took over the art publisher Gustav Lohse there. He first attended the Dresden high school, learned to play the violin with Henri Petri and received music theory lessons. After graduating from high school in 1896 at the Kreuzgymnasium, he studied violin with Joseph Joachim at the Royal University of Music and composition with Reinhold Succo. From 1898 to 1902 he studied musicology with Oskar Fleischer and Carl Stumpf as well as literary history and philosophy u. a. with Wilhelm Dilthey at the Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Berlin. In 1900 he moved to Adolf Sandberger in Munich and then to Hermann Kretzschmar in Leipzig. 1900/01 he performed as a one-year volunteer military service in an infantry regiment. In 1902 he received his doctoral thesis on the history of the instrumental (violin) concerto up to A. Vivaldi. [1] In 1907 he habilitated at the University of Leipzig with the writing The Beginnings of the Oratorio, which he published in 1911 in an expanded form under the title History of the Oratorio. He then became a private lecturer in the history and aesthetics of music at the Philosophical Faculty of the University of Leipzig (from 1908) and a lecturer in music history at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Leipzig (from 1909) then for the signals for the musical world. He also became a member of the International Music Society. From 1903 to 1905 he was the editor of the New Magazine for Music. He was a committee member of the New Bach Society in Leipzig and from 1904 to 1939 editor of the Bach Yearbook. In 1927 Schering became Chairman of the Handelgesellschaft and Chairman of the Commission for Monuments of German Tonkunst. He also headed the Collegia musica in Leipzig, Halle and Berlin. In 1927 he was made an honorary member of the Russian Imperial Institute for Art History in Leningrad. From 1928 he taught as a full professor of musicology (thus also the successor of Hermann Abert) and director of the music history seminar at the University of Berlin. His academic students included a. Adam Adrio, Helmut Banning, Helmut Boese, Wolfgang Boetticher, Siegfried Borris, Ernesto Epstein, Wilibald Gurlitt, Anneliese Landau, Helmuth Osthoff, Richard Petzoldt, Eberhard Rebling, Otto Riemer, Brigitte Schiffer, Hans Schnoor, Walter Serauky and Hellmuth Christian Wolff.

(3)
Don Leroy Smithers (born February 17, 1933 in New York City) is an American music historian and interpreter on natural trumpet and zinc, pioneer in reviving the game on the historically true natural trumpet. After studying at the Universities of Hofstra, New York and Columbia, Don Smithers received his doctorate in music history in Oxford in 1967, then became an associate professor at Syracuse University and in 1975 lecturer in music history and historical performance practice at the Royal Conservatory, The Hague, The Netherlands. As a music historian, Don Smithers has done pioneering research on the baroque trumpet, its social and historical context, and its allegorical aspect, and has published numerous articles and books. He is particularly interested in the works of J.S. Bach and the parts for brass instruments they contain. Don Smithers played a key role in reviving historically based playing techniques on authentic instruments and mouthpieces.Smithers has also contributed to the rediscovery of numerous important forgotten works, including complete music from the archives of the episcopal residence in Kroměříž (Czech Republic), which contains important works by Beaver, Schmelzer and Vejvanovský for trumpet. In 1968, Smithers set up a copy of the entire microfilm collection at Syracuse University. More recently Smithers was responsible for the film adaptation of all the manuscripts of the Schlossarchiv Sondershausen, including a large part of Gottfried Heinrich Stölzel's surviving cantatas. After early recordings with ensembles such as New York Pro Musica, Musica Reservata, and Early Music Studio, Smithers began solo recording on the trumpet and prong with ensembles from England, Italy, and Germany. He made numerous solo recordings and was on the first complete recording of the cantatas J.S. Bach played on original instruments under Gustav Leonhardt and Nikolaus Harnoncourt.


The tutti rehearsals with recording shall begin on the 12 of October in St. Burkhard Church in Wuerzburg and continue to the 15 of October.
The Concert is to take place on the 17th in St. Burkhard Church in Wuerzburg.

Artists invovled in the Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project 2020 include:

Marc Ullrich: Tromba da caccia.
Mr. Ullrich began studying the trumpet with René Christ, a professor in the Mulhouse Conservatory, his home town in Alsace. Awarded the "Prix d'Excellence" in 1969, he continued his studies in the Conservartoire Régional de Versailles in the class of Roger Delmotte, Solo Trumpeter in the Paris Opera. Receiving the "Premier Prix" in 1970, he joined the class of Maurice André's at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris. In 1971 he became Principal Trumpeter of the
Orchestre symphonique de Mulhouse: part of the Opéra du Rhin (Mulhouse, Colmar and Strasbourg).
For almost fourty years he has played the entire Baroque repertoire for one or more trumpets and strings on Modern Trumpet with this ensemble and also recorded this music in France. (Arion, Lyrinx).
In 1977 he was appointed Solo Trumpeter of the Radiosinfonieorchester Basel and in 1982 he began to study Baroque trumpet with Prof. Edward H. Tarr at the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis. Soon thereafter he particpated in many concerts together with Dr. Tarr as both soloist or ensemble member throughout Europe, and participated in diverse recordings. (Archive, Erato, Nonesuch, etc.). He was also Edward H. Tarr's teaching assistant in the Schola Cantorum in Basel.
In 2019 he retired from Orchestral work after 42 years of service.
Marc Ullrich has aswell played numerous concerts , recorded by Naxos in the series "The Art of the Baroque Trumpet".
I have worked with Marc since 1982 and recorded several CDs and performed numerous Concerts with him as both his duo partners on Baroque and Modern trumpet as well as under my Musical direction of the Deutsche Kammer Solisten (German Chamber Soloists) Chamber Orchestra. He has since 1999, been a regular performing and recording member of my Fürstbischöfliches Bläser Consortium (Prince Bischop of Wuerzburgs Wind Ensemble).

Mr. Ullrich is a co-founder of various chamber ensembles, including the “Baroque” Chamber Orchestra "La Follia" and the International Brass Virtuosi” Brass Ensemble lead by me and with which he was awarded a Prize in 1986 at the Narbonne International Brass Ensemble Competition from a Jury headed by Maurice André.
In 1999 he toured throughout Europe with the Monteverdi Choir, accompanied by the English Baroque Soloists, under John Elliot Gardiner, as part of the J.S. Bach Pilgrimage, performing exclusively on the “Vented” Baroque Trumpet with amoung other Co Baroque Trumpeters Niklas Eklund. Particularly noteworthy are the Live recordings of all concerts at Archiv, including the live recording (DVD) of the Christmas Oratorio in the Herderkirche in Weimar in 1999 performed on the Vented” (three holed) Baroque Trumpet.

I asked Marc to write something about our past cooperation and he wrote:
I, Marc Ullrich,was asked by Mr. Steuart to write a very short summary of my Professional musical cooperation(s) with him over the past 40 years, a most pleasurable request, that I herewith gladly fulfill.
I first met Mr. Steuart during the German International Classical Trumpet (ARD Radio and Television) Competition in September of 1980 of which he was the winner where we be came instant friends. When I met him again in 1981 when he played in a Concert in Basel as, once again the winner of this second most famous Classical Trumpet Competion; the Geneve (Swiss International Radio and Televison Solo Trumpet Competition) he invited me to perform with him as his Duo Partner in Germany.

Our first Concerts were “Gala Concerts” in the Historical “Hercules Saal” in the Munich Residenz performing Baroque works for two Modern Trumpets: Vivaldi, Biber, Mannfredini, etc., together with Munich Chamber Orchestra conducted by Hans Stadelmaier. In 1985 he formed the International Brass Virtuosi (Brass Qunitett) and invited me to be his Trumpet "Co-leader" for both Concerts and CD recordings.With this ensemble we won the International Brass Quintett Competion in Narbonne, France in 1986 with my former teacher Marice André as the Jury Chairman.

Over the past 40 years he has repeatedly invited me to perform and record with him in various Ensemble Projects that he has initiated and lead from Large Trumpet Ensembles and Modern Brass Quintetts perfoming on Modern Instruments to various forms of Chamber Music on both Period (Historical) and Modern instruments. We also performed several Concerts with Organ and Chamber Orchestral accompaniment.In 2015 I performed in an extended series Solo Concert Series as Mr. Steuart Duo Partner commemorating his 50 Years of Professional Musical Performance.
During the entire time I have known Mr. Steuart has repeatedly amazed me with his high level of most serious and professional musical leadership as well as his exceptional organisational abilities. He has at the same time continually inspired me by his exceptionally intensive, musical creativity. He has recently visited me here in France and presented to me his exciting prototype "Tromba da caccia", Coiled Trumpet Intrument, which I believe is a truly excellent replica of the original Tromba da caccia pictured in the famous Oil- Portrait of Gottfried Reiche. Mr. Steuart very convincingly demonstrated to me his re-discovered historical playing technique on his instrument using amoung other techniques, his rediscovered "hand-refection" technique.
I am therefore most pleased that he has once again invited me to be involved with this, Clarino / Natural Trumpet / Tromba da caccia Project,which I firmly believe promises to be a very important international contribution to Historical Trumpet Research and Performance.

As Concert- Master and String Specialist, I have asked Professor Doctor Pauline Nobes of London, England to lead the Baroque String Ensemble for this project that she will organise herself to this end.


Prof. Dr. Pauline Nobes, Baroque violin, Leader:

Pauline Nobes is recognised as one of Europe’s foremost specialists in historical performance practice. She has recorded and performed extensively with ensembles such as The English Baroque Soloists, The English Concert and as leader for The Academy of Ancient Music, Kölner Akademie and Musica Antiqua Köln.Pauline guest leads Das Neue Orchester and opera orchestras including Frankfurt and Madrid.
Her passion for teaching continues as Professor for Baroque violinat the Musikhochschule Würzburg (Germany) and at the Royal Northern College of Music. She was recently awarded the position of Extraordinary Professor at Stellenbosch University (South Africa).
Pauline’s Ph. D. research
focused on the unaccompanied solo violin repertory before 1750.
Her on going research reveals
‘Musick’ in Manchester from 1744/45.
Pauline Nobes musical life began as a brass player: these beginnings are not forgotten: she recorded the solo trumpet role in Beethoven's Leonore with Sir John Eliot Gardiner‘s Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique after concerts in Salzburg and New York.


I asked Pauline to write something about our past cooperation and she wrote:

My name is Pauline Nobes and I am head of the Baroque Faculty of Music at the Hochschule für Musik (University of Music) in Wuerzburg, Germany. I have as well taught for over 2 decades at among other Musical Institutions the Royal Northern College of Music, in Manchester, England.
I have known Mr. Steuart since 2005 when I first came to the University here in Germany as Baroque Violin teacher. I have found him to be a amiable and conscientious colleague. We have taught and performed together in various projects both within and outside of the University here during this time I have also heard Mr. Steuart in diverse Solo Concerts when he has performed in on both Modern and Historical Instruments. I have seen portions of his brilliant Lecture - Recording in Leipzig in November of 2017, presenting and demonstrating his new Tromba da caccia replica construction and was personally present at his fascinating lecture here at the University in January of 2018* in which he defended his Thesis of the “Hand Reflection” as a technique used on the Tromba da caccia.
I am therefore very pleased to be invited by him to be involved as both Concert Master and String Ensemble Leader for his
Clarino / Tromba da caccia Project, which I firmly believe to be very important to the furthering of Historical Trumpet Research and Performance most especially for the works of Johann Sebastian Bach.

*
Reference to:“Gesprächskonzert” January, 2018: University of Music Wuerzburg

J. S. Bach und Johann Gottfried Reiche
„Vom Wunder der musikalischen Natur”
– das Clarino des Johann Gottfried Reiche

Richard Carson Steuart, Tromba da caccia
Helmut M. Timpelan (Musikforscher), Cembalo

 

As my Sopran and as my Duo Partner for the Scarlatti Cantata, I have asked the lovely German Soprano Carmen Fuggiss to be involved in this project.
 


A short Biography of Carmen Fuggiss:
Ms. Fuggiss grew up in Freiburg, where at the age of 15 she sang in the choir of the Städtische Bühnen (City Theater). She was active in radio recordings and solo appearances and worked with Anneliese Rothenberger at the ZDF (Second German Television) in 1983.

She studied at the music academies in Karlsruhe and Frankfurt in Germany, where Armand MacLane-Lanier her most influential teacher and thereafter at the Mozarteum Salzburg, Austria with Hanna Ludwig. Majoring in Singing, Piano and Opera.After completing her studies, she began her artistic career at Mainfranken Theater Würzburg and at the Nationaltheater Mannheim.
In 1993 she received an engagement at the State Opera in Hanover, where she has worked as a lyrical coloratura soprano with a focus on parts from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to Richard Strauss. In addition, she distinguished herself in parts of the Italian subject. Her most important opera roles include Pamina (The Magic Flute), Susanna (The Marriage of Figaro), Constance (The Abduction from the Seraglio), Lucia (Lucia di Lammermoor), Gilda (Rigoletto), Sophie (The Rosenkavalier), Zerbinetta (Ariadne on Naxos) ), Alban Bergs Lulu and Aribert Reimanns Melusine.
In numerous radio and television productions, Carmen Fuggiss has shown her versatility in various genres from the Middle Ages to the modern, from Jazz to Chansons.

Carmen Fuggiss has worked with among other Conductors Georg Solti, Michael Gielen, Kent Nagano, Fabio Luisi, Semjon Bytschkow, Lothar Zagrosek, Heinrich Schiff, Hubert Soudant and Ingo Metzmacher.


I too have been fortunate in having received acceptance of my invitaion by two excellent Male singers for thsi Project: namley Kenneth Beal and Sven Fürst, both of whom I have very successfully work in the past.

Kenneth Beal
was born in Canada. He finished his Education at the University of Western Ontario (B.Mus. and B.Ed.) and the University of Toronto (Master of Music and a Diploma in Opera Performance).His Vocal performing ranges from Opera to Oratorio and Art Song. Very soon after his Graduation, he made his first Recording for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). He was also a Finalist in the CBC National Music Competition.

Kenneth was engaged with the L'Atelier lyrique de L'Opéra de Montréal where he sang such Roles as Rodolfo in Puccini's La Boheme, Ferrando in Mozart's Cosi fan tutte , Don Ramiro in Rossini's La Cenerentola, Edgardo in Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor and also Nemorino in L'Elisir d'amore.He performed in numerous Oratorios such as Rossini's Stabat Mater, Bach's St. John's Passion and St. Mathew's Passion, Haydn's Die Schöpfung , Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and Handel's The Messiah.

His European Debut came at the 'Rossini Festival' with the Frankfurt Kammeroper where he sang the Role of Dorvil from the Opera La Scala di Seta. In the same year he signed a permanent Contract with the Mainfranken Theater Wuerzburg where he is still working today.

In Wuerzburg, as well as in many other larger Theaters in Germany, Kenneth has sung such Roles as, Camille de Rossillon from Lehar's The Merry Wives of Winsor, Belmonte in Mozart's Enführung aus dem Serail and Faust from Gounod's Faust.
Since 1999 Kenneth has as well held the Position of Voice Teacher at the University of Wuerzburg.

Sven Fürst, Bass:
Sven Fürst studied in the singing class of Prof. Monika Bürgener at the University of Music / Würzburg and completed the advanced training class with honors in 2002. He visited the Master Classes of Prof. Ingeborg Hallstein and Prof. Helmut Deutsch, participating in various CD productions and radio recordings. Sven Fürst is the First Prize Winner of the 1999 Armin Knab competition, winner of the “Debut in Meran” competition in 2005, was scholarship holder of the Richard Wagner Society in 2000 and is a regular Jury Member of the National German Student Competition (“Jugend musiziert” ).
Sven Fürst maintains extensive concert activity in Germany with a repertoire that includes Oratorial works from Early Baroque to Modern, works with orchestras such as the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra, the Prague Philharmonic Orchestra or the Baden-Baden Symphony Orchestra, 
aswell as with the Würzburg Oratorio Choir and the Würzburg Monteverdi Choir. Sven Fürst has been a guest at the theaters in Würzburg, Koblenz, Eisenach and Meiningen.

As a member of the Junge Oper Köln he sang the father in "Hansel and Gretel", Papageno in the "Magic Flute" and Guglielmo in Mozart's "Cosi".

In 2010 he made his Switzerland debut at Theater St. Gallen in the production of Benjamin Switzerland's opera "Jakob von Gunten".


In August of 2017 I completed the initial constructural development of my Clarino / Tromba da caccia, a "replica" of the exact intrument that was performed upon by Johann Sebastian Bach's famous "Solo Trumpeter", Johann Gottfried Reiche. Since there are no existing original historical versions of this intruments from which to develope construction plans (other than Elias Gottlob Haussmann"s portrait itself) I decided to take the initiative and build the instrument once again, constructing it as close as possible to the intrument in the painting!
I was greatly inspired by both the mystery behind Elias Gottlob Haussmann"s portrait of Reiche and Bach's works, written specifically for Reiche, to be played specicially on his Clarino instrument.
The original instrument, shown in Hausmann's painting, has just my replica, has no valves, nor keys, nor slides, nor "intonation" holes of any kind! 

I have examined and personally tested several instruments from makers who too have in the past quite seriously attempted to construct such a Clarino instrument. Two of the best of these were both made in Leipzig and in Markt Neukirchen and both are infact on display in Leipzig: one in the Grazzi Museum and the other in the Old City Hall Museum of Leipzig even today. They are both from the excellent workshops of Syhre in Leipzig and Volgt in Markt Neukirchen.


Although Syhre of Leipzig and even the excellent Swiss histrocial instrument maker, Rainer Egger of Basel, Switzerland (not to forget mention Markus Rachet of Bamberg, who too built an excellent copy of a much later dated intrument, originally from Balthasar Fürst of Ellwangen - 1770,  on display in the German National Museum in Nuerberg) succeeded in building quite acceptable and playable instruments of this kind, it is in truth virtually impossible to reconstruct such a instrument without a direct interaction and cooperation with a truly experienced, virtuoso performer. One, who first and foremost clearly understands the instruments original playing technique.

Through building my own instrument and my personal and direct study, I has finally uncover what I believe to be the original technique of how Reiche, himself both a respected composer and a highly acclaimed virtuoso, was able to play Johann Sebastian Bach's demanding works on his mysterious and almost forgotten instrument!

The German Painter Elias Gottlob Haussmann (1695 – 1774) served as Court Painter at Dresden and from 1720 was the official Portraitist of the City State of Leipzig. He is best known for his commissioned portrait of Johann Sebastian Bach, painted in 1746. A full 20 years earlier Haussmann had been commissioned from the City “Elders” of Leipzig to paint the, by no means less famous „Senior Stadt Pfeiffer“ Gottfried Reiche, in which he is holding his special Coiled Trumpet. It is widely believed that this was to honour Reiche for his life's work for the City and this on the 60th Anniversary of his Birth. (An "official" Birthaday Present!)

It is in this Painting that the special story and historical mystery of the Tromba da caccia (Hunting Trumpet) is most visually told and which motivated me to ask the question:
Why is Bach's most famous Solo Trumpeter, Gottfried Reiche, holding such a strange instrument as this very special commemorative Portrait of himself? Why is he not holding the standard Natural “Fanfare” Trumpet that one would have expected him to play at that time in musical history. And if this is truly the instrument that he regularly performed on, why are the works of J. S. Bach not being plays on this quite obviously original and authentic “Coiled-Trumpet” today?

This instrument was certainly not a Horn according to the famous German Music Historian Prof. Dr. Karl Dietrich Arnold Schering (1877-1941)(2) Editor of the Bach Year Book / Bach Jahrbuchs from 1904 to 1939 and author of the Article Zu Gottfried Reiches Leben und Kunst / Regarding Gottfried Reiche's Life and Art.
Schering reports that Horn playing, was not a part of “Stadtpfeiffer” duties at that time and continues at that it was in fact prohibited by Mandated Law for the Military Trumpet to be to played by any person or persons other than official “Hof Trumpeters”. He makes direct reference to that which was clearly stated in not one but two “Kurfürschliche Mandaten” / Electorial Mandates, namely the Madates “Against the Unauthrporised Playing of Trumpets and Beating of Miltitray Kettledrums” from 1661, by Chur Fürst Johann Georg and reinforced again in Dresden on the 23
rd of July 1711 by his successor “August der Starke”, Elector to Saxonia and King of Poland, in which he signs as Augustus Rex this specific “Prohibition”.It was therefore clearly forbidden in Saxonia for a common City Musician (even one as highly respected as Bach's Solo-Trumpeter Gottfried Reiche) to play the Natural- (Military) Trumpet. Hense Reiche must have performed exclusively upon a so called Italian Trumpet or Coiled-Trumpet (also called a Tromba da caccia) and certainly not the protected “Fanfare”- Hof Trumpet.

 

Added to this, it is unimaginable for one to consider that Reiche would have ever allowed himself to be painted with any other instrument than that which he personally regarded most dearly (although he was as Stadt Pfeiffer contractually required to perform on several instruments, including the Oboe, Cornetto and Violin) and especially the one had made him most famous in Leipzig over the past 25 years of his work for the both the City and in diverse University and Rathhaus Concerts. But Reiche performed in Cantatas in both of the Nikolai and Thomas Churches together with both J. S. Bach starting 1723 and even more importantly for the 21 years before, with the former “Thomas Church Organist” and "Director Chori Musici Lipisiensis" / Musical Director of the City of Leipzig, Johann Kuhnau (1660-1722).
Kuhnau was as well University Music Director and the successor to a further famous Leipzig Church Musician, Johann Schelle and from 1701 to his death the direct predecessor to Johann Sebastian Bach. This means Gottfried Reiche was through his associations with both Schelle and Kuhnau and his duties as Stadt Pfeiffer a prominent and highly regarded musician long before Johann Sebastian Bach ever arrived in Leipzig.

Having been placed in a number of other locations over the past almost 3 centuries, this extraordinary painting hangs once again in the same building where, employed his entire professional career by the City of Leipzig- ultumately reaching the status of "Senior Stadtmusicus" (Senior Performing City Musician) in 1719,  Reiche performed his daily duties up to his sudden death in 1734.

In the painting Reiche is holding a pure-silver and gold ornamented "Clarin" trumpet in “circular form”, (and please, it is certainly not a horn!) which for my way of thinking must be, yes, is obviously the true "Bach" trumpet, ... what else can it be?! 
In his left hand he is holding an „Abblas“ piece, (perhaps his own composition?,... very probably!) which he performed as his “Encore” at the end of his Tower music duties. A flashy "signature fanfare" which he very surely performed from the "Leipziger Rathhaus Turm" as a part of daily musical duties as Senior Stadt Pfeiffer of the City of Leipzig.

It has been postulated, that because this instrument was made of pure Silver and Gold it was therefore very rare and other wise extremely expensive. I suggest that the instrument could have been a personal gift from King August II to Reiche (for his 60th birthday?) in high appreciation of “exceptional musical abilities and continued loyal service to the Duke of Saxony and King of Poland!”? 

Other theories as to the origin of this intrument come for example from the American Scholar and Trumpeter Don L. Smithers, who suggests that perhaps it is a much older instrument, made in the Nuremberg workshops of Johann Leonard Ehe I in the late 17th century or even by another famous Nuremberg instrument maker, Johann Carl Ködisch. Some think it was originally for the Moravian Court of the Markgrafen of Olmuetz, and was most specifically constructed for the use of the Court Composer and Senior Court Trumpeter, Pavel Josef Vejvanovky (1633-1693). These postulations, in my opinion, do not "fit" the possible time line and have nop real basis of fact.

Further speculations suggest it was even much older instrument and that it was in fact Anton Schnitzer who had built this special trumpet in the late 16th / early 17th century, since Schnitzer had created the most innovative instruments of his time, including the very famous "Pretzel Trumpet" for none other than Caesare Bendinelli, composer, author and principal trumpeter at both the Viennese court from 1567 to 1580 and there after at the Bavarian Court in Munich from 1580 until his death in 1617.

These ideas and speculations however interesting and colorfull in nature, are not historically supported nor documented in any historical texts.



Some specific  facts about the Tromba da caccia and it's use in Germany (Saxonia) in te 17th and 18th century are however very clearly documented.

Since the German musicologist Michael Praetorius mentions and even clearly illustrates the "Clarino Trumpet" (in Coiled form) in his work "Syntagma Musicum" published in Wolfenbüttel and Wittenberg in three parts between 1614-1620, this kind of Coiled Trumpet was well known and widely performed upon in Europe and this long before Reiche was even born.

We know that Reiche performed regularly on this special Clarino instrument in Leipzig. We know too that Cantata 215 "Preise dein Glücke, gesegnetes Sachsen" was written by Johann Sebastian Bach specifically for Reiche to be performed by him on October 5th, 1734. which was the fateful night when he died of exhaustion (heart attack and/or a stroke?) on his way home, following the first performance of this Cantata!  We know too that the performance took place outside and directly in front of the Historical City Hall in Leipzig and under no less than Johann Sebastian Bach's personal musical direction.
We know as well that Reiche was most certainly the Solo Trumpeter for whom Johann Sebastian Bach had written not only this work but as well as all of his most challenging and difficult secular and religious compositions involving the Clarino dating from 1723 through to 1734, including the Christmas Oratorio. 

There is also no doubt that a very special relationship between these two exceptional musicians began immediately after Bach's arrival in Leipzig in 1723, when Bach assumed the prestigious position of "Director Chori Musici Lipisiensis" (Musical Director of the City of Leipzig), a position he was to maintain until his death in 1750.
Bach even revised several of his previous Cantatas composed in Weimar and even earlier to accommodate and even feature Reiche's extraordinary abilities on the Tromba da caccia.

One last and important fact that we are sure of: The very last musical statement of Reiche's life, as 1st Clarino in the final Coro: "Stifter Reiche, Beherrscher der Kronen" of Cantata 215, was a beautifully lyrical melody. Here Reiche was allowed to "sing" with his "Clarino" above the whole ensemble.
Such lyrical, obligato parts were typically played on a Tromba da caccia, (circular trumpets in Coiled form) since these parts were necessarily required to be performed in perfect balance, and with unfailing intonation and musical inflection, supporting and enhancing the soprano voice part.

In an attempt to perfect it's construction and understand and revive the original playing technique of the  Coiled Trumpet /Tromba da caccia, I have been seriously researching, building and rebuilding my own version of the "Clarino" trumpet since 2015. I firmly believe that the special musical relationship between Reiche and Bach (although a total of only 11 years!) created the rare historical opportunity for the art of trumpet performance to develop above and beyond it's former limited role of loud and dramatic musical "sound and fury" on the Military Trumpet of that time. To go beyond the usual forceful military fanfare style of the time and to be suddenly set at the forefront of Bach's most sensitive and lyrically interactive musical expressions in both his Sacred Cantatas as well as his worldly works performed in Leipzig from 1723 was the goal of the development of this high art of Clarion playing as propigated by Gottfried Reiche and his colleagues.

Reiche quite obviously had perfected his special musical gifts and highly developed Tromba da caccia playing technique, even before Bach's arrival in Liepzig. However the combination of Bach's music for the trumpet and Reiche's special performaning abilities allowed the beginning of a new and much more lyrical musical role for the Natural Trumpet and this is especially evident in J. S. Bach's Choral Music involving the Tromba da caccia. 

J. S. Bach's works are truly the ultimate challenge when playing the Tromba da caccia, especially in the Clarino range!


 

 

 

 

"From an Interview with the Journalist Bobby Langer" (Originally in German):

"Richard Carson Steuart has been living in a music "laboratory" in Wuerzburg Germany that he calls "La Tromba Music" and this for over 20 years. Where others have a living room, he has a combination of studio, study, practice room and trumpet museum.
In the largest room there is a grand piano, 2 electric pianos, a harpsichord, two music writing desks, a sofa and a PC workstation.
Hand-painted historical Trumpet and Trombone cross-sectional technical drawings hang on the walls, lots of sheet music, music stands, music books and of course diverse CD towers.
On the floor next to the grand piano by the window there are about 20 different trumpets on stands and on the right, where the room has a curvature, a further 50 trumpets are lined up on a wall gallery, some of them 150 years old, but all fully functional and always ready and waiting to be played at any moment.
And of course mouthpieces, mouthpieces, mouthpieces everywhere mouthpieces. I can feel it: Music takes place here, music is "lived" here!

"These trumpets and mouthpieces are just my "paint brushes" with which I can create different musical pictures," Richard explained.

Richard told me he came to Germany on the advice of "a true Gentleman-Englishman".
"I was in London in September 1978 after the summer session of the World Youth Orchestra ended. After a few weeks of unpatient waiting I finally got an appointment to visit the famous "Sir Philip Jones", the
"Principal " of the Trinity College of Music, London at his noble flat in the posh "Hamilton Terrace" district of London.
Sir Philip was by far the most famous Classical Trumpeter of his time (alongside the Frenchman, Maurice André) and had been the Solo trumpeter of no less than 6 different Major English Orchestras including the Covent Garden and London Symphony Orchestra and this over several decades, as well founding and leading the world's most successfull Large Brass Ensemble: The Philip Jones Brass Ensemble.
"I played the first half of the Hindemith Sonata for him (without accompaniment)" Richard continued, "when he suddenly interrupted me and said: "Please put your trumpet in the case... now, tell me, what do you want from me?"
"I replied: You are most famous Trumpeter in England, perhaps the world! I want, of course, to study with you!"
He replied: "Huh!?, you do not need to study! And I certainly don't need your money. I may not be the best trumpeter in the world but I am by far the richest! Better you go to Germany and find a job in a German Orchestra, they are looking for players like you!"...
"But, I want to live in England" I said, rather shocked by his suggestion and continued "my forefathers come from Great Brittan... I don't even speak German!?! and, and, and I want to be a Soloist not an Orchestral player".
He said." You have to be realistic young man... nobody knows you here,... you have to get your foot in the door, somehow!?! and you can easily learn German, it's not that difficult!" 
"But, but, I have played for and recieved a Full Years "Study Grant" from the Canadian Arts Council to study here with you", (or someone else in Europe? I thought to myself), "and that was no easy task!". He simply said "give it back, someone else can use it, you don't need it" 
I thought "What!?!, do I look crazy or something? what's this all about?"
But said instead: "OK, Thank you so much" and went away, all be it  some bewildered.
The next day I took an over-night train straight to Munich in Germany and saw to it that I got  "audition preparation" lessons from Rolf Quinque, then Solo Trumpeter of the Munchen Philharmonic / Professor at the Richard Strauss Conservatory and a very well respected High-Register Solo-Trumpet Specialist. Then I wrote to apply for all jobs that were open at that time and immeadiately got an invitation to go to Düsseldorf. 10 days later and right after my third lesson with Mr. Quinque I left Munich on the 3rd of November for Düsseldorf and the next day won the audition for Solo Trumpet of the "Deutsche Oper am Rhein". After only 2 more months in Europe, was offered the Solo-Trumpet position in the Bamberg Symphony Orchestra, under the world famous Conductor and Anton Brückner specialist, Eugen Jochen and this by a Special Telegramm sent by the Orchestral Büro of the Bamberg Orchestra! (Truly, "old school"!)
With my first audition in Europe and within 4 months I was 1. Soloist in not one but two A-Plus Orchestras in Germany! Wow!
In addition, together with my new colleagues, Enrique Crespo (Solo Trombonist) and Wolfgang Gaag (Solo Horn) of the Bamberger Symphoniker I became co-founded the "German Brass" (even the name of the Ensemble came from me!) in the fall of 1979! What "beginners luck"! ... and for an Encore I was able to give back my 3rd Canada Council Study Grant... "for some one lese to use" as Sir Philip had suggested..."
"By the way, the very next year, Sir Philp sat as "Chair" in Jury of the 1980 German Radio and Televisions "Munich Compeition" for Solo Trumpeters, where I was give the Top Prize.
I of course took time after the Competition to thank Jones personally for the "best lesson I ever had" and we even went out and had a few drinks together with two other Jury members and now "new colleagues" : Chandelor Goetting, then Solo Trumpet of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and the famous Historical Trumpet specialist and later a personal friend of mine, Dr. Edward H. Tarr!..."
Steuart's singular, abitious aim with his "Clarino- Project zu Leipzig" initiative is to revive the true and authentic playing tradition of this historical "Bach Trumpet" and to reaffirm it as the true instrument for which Bach wrote his Clarino parts.
With his initiative he hopes to inspire both Professional  and especially Young musicians, to once again learn to play this intrument and thereafter perform Bach's works "authenically" on the original Clarino Trumpet! Yes, as Bach's works were performed almost 300 Years ago!


 

FYI:
A short Bio of Richard Carson Steuart
as a part of his explaination as to his motivation to offer this

La Tromba Music ProductionsWebsite:

My studies of the trumpet began in 1965 (at age 9) in my home town of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
At age 14, I became the main Trumpet Teaching-Assistant to the Head of the Brass Department, Dr. Mel Carey, at the University's Music Conservatory. There I taught Classical Trumpet and Brass Ensmble for 6 years. After furthering my private Master Class Studies in the USA in 1976 (Philadelphia) and '77 (Chicago) and then in 1978 in London England, I came to Europe in the fall of 1978 (at age 22) to begin my European Classical and Orchestral Career.
During this time I also taught at Music Colleges and diverse "Institutes of Higher Musical Studies" here in Germany parallel to my Orchestral and Solo performing career.
I taught first at the Franconian Regional Music Academy in Bad Königshofen (from 1979-1991) parallel to both of my positions as (co-founder and 1. Solo trumpeter) of the German Brass Ensemble and as the world touring Bamberg Symphony Orchestra. From 1982/3 to 2001 I taught at the City Music Conservatory in Würzburg where I had accepted a position specifically created for me by the Bavarian State's Ministry of Culture in coordination with the City of Wuerzburg.
This city institution was intigrated into the State Hochschule für Musik Wuerzburg in 2001 where I continue today as Full-Tenured Lecturer, teaching an exclusive class of both private and "exceptionally gifted music students" at what now is called the Bavaian State "University of Music" (Hochschule für Musik) in Würzburg. 


Klick here to see the video.


During my entire time as professional musician here in Europe (since 1978) I have been very fortunate to have been able to be involved with and often personally organised and sponsored through my La Tromba Music Productions firm, various State-Wide Student Competitions in Bavaria and to initiate and often "Chair" International Competions Master Classes i.e. as member of the Jury for the International Munich "ARD- Wettbewerb". I have aswell organised diverse advanced Music Courses for Professionals and Grad-Students, many of these in cooperation with my own "European Brass Academy" (EBA), while others through the "European Trumpet Guild" (ETG) and/or the "International Trumpet Guild" (ITG). The ITG is itself an very large organisation based in the US with over 6000 members worldwide and for which I have performed, recorded and co-produced CD recordings such as my: "Music for Guitar and Trumpet" CD, which I am proud to report became the ITG's "CD of the Year" in 2010!

Honored by invitaions from the ETG and ITG to contribute to "Trumpet Artistry", as both a Lecturer and performing Artist , I have taught and performed as featured Soloist since 2000 in the USA as well as in England, the Ukraine, Russia, Poland, Solvenia, Croatia and Germany for the ETG/ITG.
These included the 2000, 2001 and 2003 ETG / ITG Conferences in Germany, the ITG Confernce in Manchester England in 2005 and at the first and 'til now only Canadian ITG Confernce in 2008, which took place at the Banff School of Fine Arts, in Alberta, Canada.

I was recently honoured by the Board of the ITG as I was asked once again to Perform as Featured Soloist in a "formal" Piano and Trumpet Recital at their Miami 2019 International Conference. Daniel Delgado, my new young Spanish Pianist from Salamanca, Spain and I performed original historical works and presented on diverse "period instruments"- works from Girolamo Fantini, Giovani Bonaventura Viviani, Pavel Vejvanowsky and Johann Sebastian Bach to Josef Kail and Jean Baptist Arban as well as modern works by Herbert Lincoln Clarke and the Sonatas of Paul Hindemith, Kent Kennan and Bertold Hummel.
Further works include those from George Gershwin, (Rhapsody in Blue!) Henri Tomasi Concerto (2nd Mvmt. Noctura) and Leonard Bernstein (Rondo for Leifey) and yet still others from the 21st Century and "far beyond"... we performed on several special instruments including the new  La Tromba "Tromba da caccia"  and a very special "Electronic Flugelhorn/Trumpet Combination"... for which I am presently writing a new SOLO work!)


Over the past 50 (and more) years of my broad spektrum professional musical career, I have been very fortunate to have met and made friends with many fine Performing Artists and Teachers from Jazz to the Classic gendres: such as Fred Mills, Bobby Shew, Philip Jones, Timofey Dokschitzer, Maurice Andre, Rafael Mendez, Venjamin Margolin, Tiger Okoshi, Morris Murphy, Michael Laird, Valery Posvaluk, Guy Touvron, J. F. Madeuf, Marc Ullrich, Dr. Edward H. Tarr and many many more throughout the world and then inturn, have had the great honor and pleasure of being able to personally invite many of these fine Artists and Teachers to come here to Germany to work and teach here with me as European Brass Academy / La Tromba Music Productions Professors!
It is because of their work, done over the past 40 years and more with many of my students and those too of my colleagues here at the Würzburg University aswell in and through other institutions throughut Europe, combined with diverse Concerts and Recordings here in the EU, Canada, Russia and the USA that has not only brought a great deal of joy to me personally but has markedly generated a high degree of sincere musical inspiration and appreciation for virtually all that have been involved in these endevors,... both Concert listeners, Students and Professors alike! 

Since 1980 I have, parallel to these Artistic and Pedagogical activities, cooperated in various international Instrumental Research and Development capacties.
Interacting and consulting with Brass Intrument makers such with as Schilke Trumpets (and then the great Renold Schilke personally) of Chicago, USA; the Yamaha Musical Instrument Company of Hamamatzu, Japan (and Toshi Kamiama "San") I was involved in the development of special Rotary Valve intruments for both the Bamberg Symphony Orchestra "Trumpet Section" as well as for the "original" German Brass Trio,- Quartet,- Quintet- and lastly the GERMAN BRASS Large Ensemble Constellation begining in 1984/5.
More intensely though, here in Germany I have worked with amoung others, Herbert Laetzsch /Hans-Hermann Nienaber of Bremen and both Josef Tilz and Josef Klier of Neustadt an der Eisch, in the development of my own diverse line of La Tromba Trumpets and Mouthpieces.

Starting in 1997 I was asked to fly frequently to the USA to work personally with Zigmant Kanstul of Anaheim, California for the development of first his and eventually my own La Tromba high brass instruments. To this end I worked in both the USA and Germany with both Heinz Poggensee and Zigmand Kanstul on many Research and Development "Cooperations", including the further development of Modern and Traditional German and Austrian rotary-valve Symphonic Trumpets as well as authenic Romantic Piston Valve Cornets and Low F- trumpets. These were developed for both international Soloists and Orchestral Musicians in Asia, Europe and the USA.

One special former cooperation instrument of which I am most proud of to date, is my development of the now internationally celebrated Kanstul Model 1520 Bb/A/G piccolo trumpet!
Zig Kanstul died in 2017 and Kanstul Musical Instruments is now out of business but the Prototype "BAG" Trumpet, the very first Kanstul / La Tromba Cooperation from 1997, on which I still perform today is shown in the R and D section of this website and can
be heard at the beginning of the newest La Tromba "YouTube" which we shot "Live in Leipzig" in November 2017.
In the mean time we at La Tromba Music Productions build our own B/A/G piccolo trumpet with all materials made here in Germany.

 

Rudolf Ramming, Piano and Richard Carson Steuart performing Bach's Flute Sonata in E -flat Major (BWV 1031) on the La Tromba B/A/G Piccolo Trumpet here with special Wooden "Chamber Music" Bell.

Since 1980, Steuart has cooperated in research and development capacties on modern instruments, interacting and consulting with among other international instrument makers, the Yamaha Musical Instrument Company of Hamamatzu, Japan (i.e. when creating special Rotray-Valve instruments for the Bamberg Symphony Orchestras Trumpet Section as well as for both the "original" German Brass Quintet and later Large Ensemble), with Herbert Laetzsch / Hans-Hermann Nienaber, Bremen and Josef Tilz /Hablowitz and Josef Klier, Diespeck / Neustadt an der Eisch, Germany, for La Tromba Mouthpieces in Würzburg and last but not least with Zigmant Kanstul Musical Instruments of Anaheim, California.

He worked in both California and Germany from 1997 with Zigmant Kanstul on many instrument design, research and development cooperations , included Traditional and Romantic German and Austrian rotary-valve Symphonic Trumpets for both Soloists and Orchestral Musicians. 
And as well and specifcally for Baroque Music, his most remarkable contribution to the world of the trumpet artistry to date, is the celebrated Kanstul Model 1520 Bb/A/G piccolo trumpet! 
The original La Tromba Prototype "BAG", a Kanstul/ La Tromba Cooperation from 1997, is in fact shown on the R and D section of this website.
Richard Carson Steuart continues to research, study  and build refined instruments and mouthpieces, both of historical and modern design, primarily, but not exclusively for his own Artistic needs and these under his own exclusive La Tromba Brand,... Made in Germany.

Richard Carson Steuart performing on his new Tromba da caccia in front of Elias Gottlob Haussmann (1695-1774) original painting of Johann Gottfried Reiche (1667-1734)

The original painting of Johann Gottfried Reiche (1667-1734) (Oil on Canvas) by Elias Gottlob Haussmann (1695-1774), dates from 1726/27 and hangs in the Historical City-Museum of the Old City Hall in Leipzig (Inv.Nr. Me 470).
The instrument held in his right hand is described as: a "Trompete in zirkulärer Form" (Trumpet in Cirular Form): Clarino, Jägertrompete, Tromba da caccia, Italienische Trompete.

It is unimaginable to consider that Reiche would have himself be painted with any other instrument than that which made him famous in Leipzig. Having been placed in a number of other locations over the past almost 3 centuries, this extraodinary painting hangs once again in the same building where, employed his entire professional career by the City of Leipzig- ultumately reaching the status of "Senior Stadtmusicus" / Senior Performing City Musician in 1719, Reiche perfomed his daily duties as Head "Stadt Pfeiffer". Yes even up to his sudden death in on October the 6th 1734.
In this painting Reiche is holding in his right hand, a pure-silver and gold ornimented "Clarino" trumpet in circular from, (and please, it is certainly not a horn!) which obviously is the true "Bach" trumpet, what else can it be?!  In his left hand he is holding an „Abblas“ peice, perhaps his own composition?,... very probably!
A flashy "signature fanfare" which he very surely performed from the "Rathhaus Turm" as a part of daily musical duties as Senior Stadt Pfeiffer of the City of Leipzig.

It has been postulated, that because  Reiche's instrument was made of pure Silver with Gold ornimentations it was very rare and other wise extremely expensive and Steuart suggests that the instruemnt was most probably a personal gift from King August II to Reiche (for his 60th birthday?) in high appreciation of Reiche's exceptional musical abilities and continued loyal service to him, the Duke of Saxony and King of Poland! 

Other theories are that it is perhaps a much older instrument, made in the Nuermberg workshops of Johann Leonard Ehe I in the late 17th century or by perhaps by another famous Nuernberg instrument maker, Johann Carl Ködisch and originally for the Moravian Court Musicians of the Markgrafen of Olmuetz, that is, most specifically for the use of the composer and Senoir Court Trumpeter, Pavel Josef Vejvanovky (1633-1693).
 

Further speculations suggest it was an even much older instrument and that it was infact Anton Schnitzer who had built this special trumpet in the late 16th / early 17th century, since Schnitzer had created the most innovative instruments of his time, including the very famous "Pretzel Trumpet" in 1685 for none other than Caesare Bendinelli, composer, author and principal trumpeter at both the Viennese court from 1567 to 1580 and there after at the Bavarian Court in Munich from 1580 until his death in 1617. These ideas and speculations however interesting and "Romantic" in nature, are not historically documented.

Some specific facts about the Tromba da caccia and it's use in Germany (Saxonia) are
not conjecture but rather very clearly documented since the German musicologist Michael Praetorius mentions and even clearly illustrates the "Clarino Trumpet" (in Coiled form) in his "Syntagma Musicom" published in Wolfenbüttel and Wittenberg (in three parts between 1614-1620) this kind of Circular Instrument. It was therefore well known and widely performed upon in Europe long before Reiche was even born.
We know too that Cantata 215 "Preise dein Glücke, gesegnetes Sachsen" was written by Johann Sebastian Bach specificaly for Reiche and to be performed by him on October 5th, 1734.
We know that Reiche performed regularily on this special Clarino instrument in Leipzig and most surely on the fatefull night of October 5th to the 6th, 1734 when he died of exhaustion (heart attack and/or a stroke?) on his way home, following this first performance of Cantata BWV 215! 
We know too that the perfomance took place outside and directly in front of the Historical City Hall in Leipzig and under no less than Johann Sebastian Bach's personal musical direction. We know aswell that Reiche was most certainly the Solo Trumpeter for whom Johann Sebastian Bach had written not only this work but as well all of his most challenging and difficult secular and religious compositions involving the "Clarino" dating from 1722/1723 through to 1734, including the Christmas Oratorio!
There is also no doubt that a very special colleagial relationship between these two exceptional musicians began immediately after Bach's arrival in Leipzig in 1723, when Bach assumed the prestegious position of "Director Chori Musici Lipisiensis" (Musical Director of the City of Leipzig), a position he was to maintain until his death in 1750.

Bach even revised several of his previous Cantaten composed in Weimar and and some dated even earlier to accommidate and even feature Reiche's extraordinary abilities on the Tromba da caccia.
One last and important fact that we are sure of: The very last musical statement of Reiche's life, as 1st Clarino in the final Coro: "Stifter Reiche, Beherrscher der Kronen" of Cantata 215, was a beautifully lyrical melody. (The German expression "Stifter Reiche" phrase has a double meaning here since "Stifter Reiche" translates to "Reiche's Benifactor", supporting my theory that this spoecial instrument was infact made for and given to Reiche from August the Starke:
In any event Reiche was allowed to "sing" with his "Clarino/Tromba da caccia" up to high E ''' in the Final "Chor"and so well above the whole ensemble.
Such lyrical, obligato parts were typically played on a Tromba da caccia, (circular trumpets in Coiled form) since these parts were necessarily required to be performed in perfect balance, and with unfailing intonation and musical inflection,
with unfailing intonation and musical inflection, supporting and often enhancing the soprano voice part .

Reiche's pure-silver and gold "Clarino" trumpet, obviously the true "Bach" trumpet, is quite without any intonation holes, nor keys, nor slides, nor valves of any kind! Steuart proposes that this special instrument was perhaps a gift from none other than "Kuerfuerst und Herzog" of Saxony Friedrich August I, also known as "August der Stärke" (1670-1733) who was from 1697 in "Personalunion", King August II of Poland and Lithuainia. This must have been a truly "Kingly" gift for Gottfried Reiche, in high appreciation of his exceptional musical service to Saxony and for his King!

 

Steuart, who in an attempt to perfect it's construction and understand and revive the original playing technique of the Hunting Trumpet / Tromba da caccia, has been seriously researching, building and rebuilding his own version of "Clarino" trumpet since 2015. He firmly believes that the special musical relationship between Reiche and Bach (although a total of only 11 years!) created the rare historical opportunity for the Art of Trumpet performance in ensemble context, to develop above and beyond it's former limited role of loud and dramatic musical "sound and fury" and often forcefull military / fanfare style but in fact to be suddenly set at the forefront of Bach's most sensitive and interactive musical expressions.
The combination of Bach's music for the trumpet and Reiche's special performance abilities was the beginning of a new and much more lyrical musical role for the instrument to come with the invention of the Valve in 1812. One that through his special musical gifts and highly developed playing technique on the Tromba da caccia, Reiche quite obviously had perfected even in the early 18th century!

 


 

The new La Tromba "Clarino" / Tromba da caccia trumpet pictured below, was, together with other "prototype" and original La Tromba Instruments presented and performed upon for the first time in public by Richard Carson Steuart in a special lecture / concert-- that was film- documented on the 18th of November, 2017 at 3 P.M., in the "Historical City Hall" in Leipzig, Germany.
This Lecture/Concert with Interview was open to the general public and admission was free of charge!

 

 

 

Introducing: The new La Tromba "Clarino"

 

 

Richard Carson Steuart's Early Musical Studies and
Short Artisic Biography


Born on January 31st, 1956 in Weyburn, Richard moved with his family to Regina in 1960. His first intensive musical instruction began in 1965, on his 9th birthday under the tutelage of his father, Kenneth Leslie Steuart, a SaskTel Telecommunications Engineer and a serious brass-playing hobby musician.
Richard performed his first public concert as Cornet Soloist in Rosemont United Church in Regina, in 1966 together with Ms. Edith Chisholm and this after only one year of any kind of musical studies.

At age 11, Richard undertook his first "Jazz" tour as featured "junior" Trumpet Soloist as a part of the 1967 Canadian National Centenary Concert Festivities. He was accompanied by a professional Big Band led by his first teacher, Dr. John Harding. At age 12 he began to study the Piano, Clarinet, Oboe as well as Musical History, Theory and Harmony at the Conservatory of Music in Regina.
Richard was a repeated Class A-Open First Prize winner in the Regina and Saskatchewan Music festivals for the Cornet and Trumpet and was as well the Junior First Prize Winner (at age 11) of the Canadian National Music Festival in 1967.
Intensely involved in various musical groups in Regina and throughout Saskatchewan from the very beginning of his studies, he performed with the Salvation Army Brass, the Regina Police Boys and the Saskatchewan Youth Bands, the Regina Inter- Collegiate and Saskatchewan Youth Orchestras and the University of Saskatchewan Brass Quintet, Symphonic Concert and Jazz Big Bands.  Richard became a member of the Regina Symphony Orchestra 1969 at age 13, advancing to the Solo Trumpet position in the 1971/72 season. 
In 1970, at the age of 14, he accepted his first Trumpet Teaching- Assistantship under Dr. Mel Carey at the University of Saskatchewan, Regina Campus. Having previously studied Saxophone, Clarinet at the Regina Conservatory, he also found time to teach beginner Clarinet and Saxophone for the Regina City School District.From 1970 to 1975, he was Solo Trumpeter and featured Solist of both the National Youth Chamber and National Youth Symphony Orchestras of Canada performing extended Summer Concert tours in among other major Canadian cities: Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec and Montreal with these orchestras.
In 1976, at age 20 and already CBC Radio Soloist and Solo-trumpeter of Canadian Chamber Orchestra, he won both the First Prize at the Canadian National Music Festival in Toronto and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Radio and Television Classical Solo-Instrumental Competition - the "CBC Talent Festivalâ? and this for all Wind Instruments. There after he was accepted into the famous Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, USA receiving a full 4 year Scholarship. He was as well awarded the first of three consecutive international Study Grants (1976-1978) from the Arts Council of Canada, with which he subsequently studied in Chicago and New York with the foremost members of the Symphony and Opera Orchestras of those major American cultural centres.

Travelling to Europe in the summer of 1978 as Solo Trumpet of the World Youth Orchestra, he completed his studies first in London and then Munich and accepted on November 4th the Solo Trumpeter position in the German Opera in Düsseldorf.

In February of 1979 he accepted the position as Solo Trumpeter of the world touring, "Bamberg Symphonikerâ?. He is the co-founder of among several other high profile ensembles, the German Brass Ensemble (1979), the Munich Brass (1983) the European Baroque (1989) and the "Prince Bishop"s Wind Ensembleâ? (1999).

Richard competed for and won both the German- ARD (1980) and Swiss- SRF (1981) International Radio and Television Competitions for the Trumpet as Solo Instrument.

His musical accomplishments were officially honoured by the Bavarian State Ministry of Culture when they created a special position for him in 1983 at the Music Conservatory / State University of Music in Wuerzburg, Northern Bavaria where he continues to teach both Historical and Modern Trumpet and Chamber Music today.

Through performing thousands of live concerts, producing over 20 Solo and Ensemble CDs from Classic to Jazz for his own CD "La Tromba Music Productions" company alone, as well as recording with various top musical constellations as both Grand Opera and Symphonic Solo-Trumpeter, Solo Concert Soloist, Chamber Ensemble and "Soloist-Leader", Mr. Steuart"s Classical Music experience has over the 50 years of his musical career become truly extensive.

As featured Recording-Artist for the CBC, WDR, BR, SDR, ARD, SRF, Radio and Television stations as well for the RCA, BMG, EMI, MMO and Konstantin Film and Koch- International CD and Film Production companies and through his touring with well known groups ranging from English and German Pop and Rock to Brass and Symphonic Concert and Barss Bands, Brass Ensembles, Diverse Jazz Formations, Big Bands and Modern-Fusion-Music Groups as well as with Internationaly aclaimed Historical Music Ensembles, yes even for major European and Hollywood Films, Mr. Steuart's musical knowledge and experince has developed well over 50 years! He has in performmed in Germany with members of the Berlin Philharmonic, the Munich Philaharmonic, the Bavarian, Hessische, Baden-Würtenbürgisches Radio Orchestras in Freiburg, Baden Baden, Stuttgart, Klarls rühe and Saarbrücken the Collonge Radio Sympnony Orcjstzra (WDR) the Bamberg Symphony, the German Operas of Hamburg, Nürnberg, Düsselldorf, Essen, etc etc..

Richard Carson Steuart engagements since 1982 as Guest Professor in major Music Conservatories and Universities internationally and his Concert touring in Germany, Russia, the Ukraine, the United States, Canada, China, Japan and throughout the whole of Europe, since 1967  has contributed to the high acclaim he continues to receive from both the general public and his peers alike. He is not only one of the foremost Classical Trumpeters of his generation but one of the world's most experienced, versatile and knowledgeable "Broad Spektrum Music" performers and teachers living today.

 

 

 

12th Mothersday Concert 2016

50th Musical Anniversary Concert Series 2015/16

"Valentine's Day Concert" 2016